Tag Archives: Somaliland

Taiwan-Somaliland diplomatic ties

Taiwan and the African region of Somaliland, which claims independence, will establish representative offices in each other’s capitals, Foreign Minister Joseph Wu said on July 8. Till present Taiwan has formal diplomatic ties with 15 countries because of pressure from the Communist China, which considers the island to be an integral part of its territory with no right to state-to-state relations.

However in February this year Taiwan signed the agreement with Somaliland, strategically located on the Horn of Africa, and Minister Wu added Taiwan’s contacts with Somaliland, a self-declared state internationally recognised only as an autonomous region of Somalia, dated back to 2009.

The top diplomat told reporters in Taipei that eight other nations or international bodies had representative offices in Somaliland, including Ethiopia, although not China.

“I think what we are doing is not much different from other countries,” Wu said, adding that Somaliland had declared independence in 1991 and since then held three democratic presidential elections.

“They have been recognised by many countries as a very free, democratic country in Africa,” the diplomat added. “So, in essence, Somaliland is an independent country.”

China’s influence is not far away, though, as it runs its first ever overseas military base in neighbouring Djibouti.

“International military forces, including those from China, patrol the waters around Somalia on anti-piracy missions.

China and Taiwan have traded barbs for years over the international recognition of the island.

In Africa only the Kingdom of Eswatini has established full diplomatic ties with Taiwan, however in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Embassy doors remain closed.

EU welcomes Somalia-Somaliland dialogue

“The resumption of dialogue between Somalia and Somaliland that occurred in Djibouti on 14 June is an important and positive step in the process of normalising their relations, bringing renewed hope not only for the people of Somalia and Somaliland but for the whole Horn of Africa. It is an essential part of confidence-building measures to reconcile differences and promote peace-building, prosperity and development in the region. Djibouti and Ethiopia played a determining role in making this dialogue happen”, reads the text of the EU top diplomat Josep Borrell.

“Somali President Mohamed Abdillahi Mohamed Farmaajo and Moussa Bihi Abdi committed to continue working on advancing this peace-making process.

“Continuation of these talks without interruption and in good faith is the only sustainable way forward for a durable peace, prosperity and security. The European Union, present as an observer to the talks, will spare no efforts to support the process”.

Both Somalia and Somaliland are intended to celebrate in a few days the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the whole of Somalia from colonizers.

A former British protectorate, Somaliland got its independence in 1960 but days later joined Somalia. In 1991, it declared independence from the rest of the country following war with the government in the capial city Mogadishu.

Cheetahs confiscated in Somaliland

This cheetah family includes young adults and adorable cubs were rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. Confiscated in Somaliland, the cheetahs were being sold as exotic pets, their mothers no doubt killed by poachers. (Image: illustration)

Happily they all now live at Born Free Foundation rescue centre Ensessa Kotteh in Ethiopia and one day there is a hope some of them will be returned to the wild, but for time being the fund will help provide their food and care.

However the youngest because of their age do not know how to hunt so will need to be supported for the rest of their lives.

From the times of pharaohs of Ancient Egypt cheetahs were used as noble hunting animals by African rulers, unfortunately in the XXI century they become must-have luxury accessories for rich young Arabs to flaunt alongside diamonds and sports cars.

Poached animals often die in transit because they are transported by criminals who show no regard for their welfare. According to charity the Cheetah Conservation Fund, only one in six cubs survive being trafficked.

More than 7,100 cheetahs survive in the wild and the CCF says at least 300 animals are sold each year on the ­illegal exotic pet black market.