Category Archives: Crisis

Shia Muslim clashes close to Nigeria National Assembly

On July 9 Nigeria’s National Assembly was on lockdown after shots were heard outside during clashes between police and a group of Shi’ite Muslim protesters.

The involved in violent clashes blamed each other for the shooting. In a statement, police clarified two officers were shot and wounded in the legs, and six other officers were injured by individuals using clubs and stones.

Police used tear gas on the protesters and smoke could be seen rising from the area.

The Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN), a group that represents Nigerian minority Shia Muslims tried to enter the complex, provoking the confrontation with police units.

One of the four injured policemen beaten up by Shi’ite protesters during a violent invasion of the National Assembly, Umar Abdulahi, a dergeant, has died.

 

Sudan’s opposition accepts Ethiopian mediator

Sudan’s main opposition coalition confirmed it had received a draft agreement from an Ethiopian mediator and had agreed to all of its points defining the country’s governmental structure for the transitional period.

Babikr Faisal, a spokesman for the Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) coalition, gave no details on the contents of the agreement.

“Our acceptance of the Ethiopian mediation proposal pushes all the parties to face their responsibilities toward continuing to effort a political solution,” the coalition later said in a statement.

Therefore we demand that the document be approved by the military council in order to move the situation in Sudan (forward).”

 

EU calls Sudan for consensus

“The use of violence today against protesters and other civilians has led to deplorable loss of life. We express our condolences to the families and friends of the victims”, said  European External Action Service (EEAS) spokesperson (pictured) in a statement, commenting outbreak of violence in Khartoum on June 3.

“There is no justification for the use of force to disperse the peaceful sit-in. The Transitional Military Council is accountable for security and rule of law in the country, and have the responsibility to act with restraint.

“We expect the Transitional Military Council to respect the right of people to voice peacefully their concerns, without any threat or use of violence. Any escalation of the use of violence can only derail the necessary political process and lead to a dangerous impasse, that will not respond to the legitimate aspirations of the people of Sudan.

“The priority should remain to find a swift consensus that allows a transfer of power to a civilian-led authority, as also prescribed by the African Union. Such an authority is the only partner with which EU-Sudan relations can be normalised.”

 

Khartoum violence outbreak

Sudanese security forces stormed a protest camp in the capital Khartoum on June 3 in the morning hours and at least nine people were reported killed in the violence outbreak.

Al Hadath and Al Jazeera television showed footage of scenes of people fleeing violence through streets of Khartoum.

The leading protest group accused the ruling military Council of an attempt to break up the camp, defining the action “a massacre”. The Council explained the security forces had targeted “unruly” groups in an adjacent area.

An alliance of protest and opposition groups announced they would halt all contact with the military Council. The two sides had been negotiating for weeks a transitional period following the overthrow of Omar Al Bashir, but without any progress.

The Transitional Military Council (TMC) had offered to let protesters form a governmental body but insists on maintaining overall authority during an interim period. The demonstrators demand the civilians to run the transitional period to ensure construction of democratic state.

After the outbreak of violence a group of medics related to the opposition said nine “martyrs” had been killed in June 3 violence and that the number of casualties was still rising.

Al-Shabaab expands into Kenya

Somali radical Islam insurgents are making their own explosives, according to a confidential U.N. report explaining their frequent and deadly attacks.

The Somali al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorist group al-Shabab extends attacks beyond borders, by recruiting new members outside Somali clans, luring them with promises of money and gifts.

In the beginning of this year an assault on an office and hotel complex in Nairobi (Kenya), was the first to be led by non-ethnic Somalis since al-Shabab began major cross-border operations in 2010.

Ali Salim Gichunge, nicknamed Farouk (26) leading Nairobi attacks was a Kenyan who attended a Catholic school and whose mainly Christian ethnic group Meru has no ties to Somalia.

Farouk is by no means exception among a growing number of Kenyans with no ethnic links to Somalia recruited by the militants in recent years, according to relatives, security officials and analysts.

Widespread poverty and unemployment create a nourishing ground for al-Shabaab recruiters offering cash or even just promises of work, researchers who interviewed defectors from the group report. The relatives of the young men said, even small gifts would work for engaging them.

“In the past, the security forces concentrated their efforts in parts of the country that are Muslim majority, Muslim-dominated,” said Murithi Mutiga, a project director for the International Crisis Group think-tank, he added that, “now it’s much harder because al-Shabab has shown its adaptability by recruiting from outside the traditional areas.”

As well al-Shabab has expanded its operations from Somalia into East Africa, where it has hit high-profile targets, such as the offices of Western multinational companies.

Four dead in Sudan protests

One policeman and three protesters were killed in Sudan  Khartoum and many other demonstrators were wounded, state TV said.

The Transitional Military Council (TMC), which took over after the army overthrew President Omar al-Bashir in April blamed the violence on saboteurs who demonstrated discontent with the transition deal.

After the incidents Sudan’s ruling military council warned that it would not allow “chaos”. Four people were killed in violence that broke out over an agreement on a political transition reached by the generals and protest groups.

#LPS19: ESA upgrades Africa partnerships

Professor Dr.Martin VISBECK (@mvisbeck), head of research at Geomar, shares his views on developing new partnership with Africa on preventing natural disasters and shaping relevant strategies between ESA and African institutions and universities. The interview granted at Living Planet Symposium Milan Italy #LPS19

The European Space Agency’s 2019 Living Planet Symposium has opened its working sessions today in Milan (Italy) Convention Centre MiCo.

This symposium focuses on Earth Observation contribution to science and society, and spreading knowledge on disruptive technologies and actors, changing the traditional Earth Observation landscape, which also reveals new challenges and opens opportunities for public and private sector interactions.

 

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