Tag Archives: peace

Borrell welcomes Sudan peace agreement

“The peace agreement initialled today between the civilian-led Transitional Government of Sudan and the Sudan Revolutionary Front signifies an important milestone for the ongoing democratic and economic transition of Sudan. reads the statement by the EU top diplomat Josep Borrell on the peace agreement in Sudan.

“Mediated with the help of neighbouring South Sudan, the agreement paves the way towards the establishment of a lasting peace in Sudan.

“Only an agreement implemented in good faith and in the spirit of cooperation can live up to the needs and expectations of the Sudanese people for a better life in peace and stability.

“On this occasion, the EU calls upon Sudan People’s Liberation Movement–North-Abdalaziz Al-Hilu and the Sudan Liberation Movement-Abdul Wahid Al-Nur to join the peace efforts for the benefit of the local communities who deserve to benefit from the changes underway in Sudan. This is the time for all Sudanese stakeholders to set aside their differences and to look for the greater good of the country and of all Sudanese.

“The EU remains committed to supporting the historic Sudanese transition”.

The government of Sudan and the main rebel alliance agreed on a peace deal on Monday, August 31, ending the 17 years of conflict.

The Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF), a coalition of rebel groups from the western region of Darfur and the southern states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile, signed the peace agreement at a ceremony in Juba, capital of neighbouring South Sudan, which has hosted and helped mediate the long-running talks since late 2019.

The final agreement covers the major issues concerning security, land ownership, transitional justice, power sharing, and the return of the internaly displaced.

It also provides for the dismantling of rebel groups and the integration of their fighters into the national army.

The deal is a milestone in the transitional leadership’s step towards resolving multiple, deep-rooted civil conflicts.

Darfur roadmap towards peace

Sudanese government and nine rebel groups signed an agreement on a roadmap towards ending the protracted conflict in the Darfur region.

The deal outlines different issues the parties will need to negotiate during the latest round of talks in Juba.

“We believe this is an important step,” said Ahmed Mohamed, the chief negotiator on Darfur matters from the Sudan Revolutionary Front or SRF, a coalition of nine rebel groups involved in talks with the Sudanese government.

“This step no doubt will help the process to achieve a lasting peace in Darfur and also it will enable the transitional process in Sudan to move smoothly without hindrances,” Mohamed told AFP.

Among the issues they agreed to be discussed are the root causes of the conflict, the return of refugees and internally displaced people, power sharing and the integration of rebel forces into the national army.

The deal also announces that the Sudanese government will address land issues, such as the issues of the destruction of property during the conflict.

Khartoum has been negotiating with different rebel groups in the capital of South Sudan for two weeks, in the latest round of efforts to end conflicts in Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan.

Rebels in these areas fought violent campaigns against marginalisation by Khartoum under ousted president Omar al-Bashir.

The Darfur fighting broke out in 2003 when ethnic minority rebels took up arms against Bashir’s Arab-dominated government.

Abiy Ahmed receives Nobel Peace Prize

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to resolve the protracted conflict with Eritrea. Announced earlier in October, the Prize also honoured his mediation efforts in eastern Africa and the democratic reforms he has undertaken in his country, long ruled by authoritarian leaders.

Ethiopia witnessed a tangible progress in the months after he took power in April 2018, but the winds have since shifted: in addition to the stalled peace process with Eritrea, his reforms aimed at opening up Ethiopia have paradoxically given rise to a flare-up of ethnic tensions.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has received the Nobel Peace Prize and has been phrased by his role played  resolving the long-running conflict between the Ethiopians and Eritreans.

“I accept this award on behalf of Ethiopians and Eritreans, especially those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the cause of peace, Abiy said after he received the prestigious award in a formal ceremony at Oslo’s City Hall.

Meanwhile, the Nobel festivities have been tarnished by Abiy’s refusal to traditional questions from the media, as the ex-intelligence chief has considerably shortened the usual Nobel programme and cut out all news conferences.

The head of the Nobel Institute, Olav Njolstad, called the decision “highly problematic”,
underlining that a “free press and freedom of expression are essential conditions for a lasting peace in a democracy.”

Abiy’s team responded that it was “quite challenging for an incumbent leader to spend several days at such an event, especially when “domestic issues are pressing and warrant attention”.