Tag Archives: giraffe

Poachers killed white giraffe

Poachers have killed a rare white giraffe and its calf which caused a global interest after they were spotted at the Ishaqbini Hirola Conservancy in Garissa County,Kenya.

In a statement on March 10, the conservancy’s manager Mohammed Ahmednoor said to local media the deaths were confirmed by rangers and community members.

The carcasses were found in a skeletal state, meaning they could have died a long time ago.

“This is a very sad day for the community of Ijara and Kenya as a whole. We are the only community in the world who are custodians of the white giraffe. Its killing is a blow to tremendous steps taken by the community to conserve rare and unique species and a wakeup call for continued support to conservation efforts,” Mr Ahmednoor said.

The white giraffe made headlines across globe in 2017 after its discovery, with its unique white hide. It is white but not albino, because of a condition known as leucism.

World giraffe day

Their habitat is being lost at an alarming rate, not to mention the myriad other threats they deal with, including poaching,  the trade in giraffe parts, giraffe skin disease, vehicle collisions, and droughts.

There are a lot of factors leading to the giraffe’s 40% decline in the last 30 years that are difficult to tackle as the human population grow around many giraffe populations is soaring; that giraffes are having to travel farther to find critical resources, like food and water, due to habitat loss.

Giraffes are brilliant animals. They are known to be very smart at adapting to their environment. Giraffes have learned to gulp, while drinking water, in order to avoid predators while in a vulnerable position. When it comes to sleep, it is not easy of being able to move in a matter of seconds in the body of a 1300 kg,  but they have adapted to be able to survive on 30 minutes or less of sleep a day.

Recently the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has been asked to consider listing giraffes under the Endangered Species Act through a lawsuit after it failed to respond to 2017 listing petition. This would help the species by limiting the U.S. trade in giraffe parts and sport-hunted trophies, among other benefits.

 

Filmmaker dies after accident with giraffe

Award-winning filmmaker Carlos Carvalho (47) died a week after an accident while shooting a game lodge in South Africa. He was tragically injured when a giraffe attacked him while he was getting a close shot of the animal.

Carvalho had been shooting the majority of a series about a British family who have set up a game lodge in South Africa. While he was attempting a closeup the animal became “inquisitive” and headbutted him sending him 16 feet in the air and causing massive head injuries.

After the attack, Carvalho was airlifted to Johannesburg’s Milpark Hospital. He died  from the multiple injuries. The announcement of his death was made via a statement on the film crew agency CallaCrew’s Facebook page:

“It is with a very sad heart that we have to announce the passing of Carlos Carvalho‚ one of our favourite DOP’s. Carlos was filming a feature at Glen Afric and had a fatal run in with a giraffe on set. He was flown to Milpark Hospital but succumbed to his injuries 20:50 last night. Our thoughts and condolences go out to Carlo’s family and friends during this very sad time. He will be sorely missed.”

The animal would not be killed in retribution, as it happens in the zoo and circus, when they  attack people.

 

Endangered wild animals receive international protection

African and marine species likely to gain critical international treaty protections with overwhelming support.

Lions, leopards, giraffes, chimpanzees, sharks and other key species have received overwhelming support for critical international treaty level protections at the 12th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention for the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals, this year’s largest and most important conservation meeting.

African migratory species as well as marine wildlife have experienced dramatic declines in recent years. The Convention will now be able to facilitate the development of international conservation strategies, offer greater financial and institutional support, and increase exchange of best practices among the countries where these animals live. These listings are a culmination of years of joint effort by Humane Society International and partner organisations.

“This has been a tremendously exciting meeting. Several mammal species facing major threats in the wild will be benefiting and Humane Society International is thrilled to be a part of it. We are pleased with the decision to list the lion, leopard, giraffe and chimpanzee as among the animals to gain these new protections. The listings signal that the international community is poised for strong, concerted action to protect them” – said Masha Kalinina, international trade policy specialist for HSI.