Tag Archives: ANC

Ramaphosa sworn as South Africa President

South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa vowed to attain “hope and renewal” as he was inaugurated at a stadium in the capital Pretoria.

The African National Congress (ANC) leader vowed to fight corruption and rejuvenate the struggling economy.

Ramaphosa was elected earlier this month with a majority of 57.5%, the smallest since the party came to power 25 years ago.

Mr Ramaphosa initially took over from Jacob Zuma in 2018 after Mr Zuma was accused of corruption.

Trump declines talks with Ramaphosa amid farm murders

At margins of the United Nations General Assembly President Donald Trump declined bilateral talks with South African counterpart Cyril Ramaphosa.

Reportedly US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will have a meeting with International Relations and Cooperation Lindiwe Sisulu to clarify the  situation in South Africa upon request of the US President, who expressed concerns with ongoing brutal murders of farmers.

In a tweet a month ago President Trump asked Secretary Pompeo to clarify the situation at “land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large-scale killing of farmers”.¬†Sisulu admitted at the time to being “taken aback” by Trump‘s tweet, which followed a report on Fox News¬†claiming that the South African government had started with “racist” farm seizures against white farmers.

The concerns are aggravated by repeated calls for violence articulated by Marxist politician Julius Maleman, who calls his followers to expropriate land from white farmers. At public gatherings Malema¬†repeatedly sings¬† “kill the farmer” song, which is the “hate speech” in form and in essence.

The issue has become chronic problem, but in denial of obvious ANC ruling party did not adopt a strategy to stop farm murders, proposed by Congress of the People leader Mosiuoa Lekota.

Farm murders in South Africa continue

The Free State community of Vredefort, South Africa, has been left devastated after a farm murder claimed the life of 71-year-old Dirk Steenkamp (pictured).

As reported by OFM, Steenkamp was attacked at 07:00 on Sunday morning (4.03.2018) when he was inspecting a water pump near his property. A gang attacked him after driving to the farm and proceeded to shoot him.

Steenkamp’s wife raised the alarm shortly after hearing the gunshots, as the attackers fled. She was left unharmed in the incident.

The brutal crime has raised again the issue of farm murders in South Africa.

“The political parties in¬†South Africa¬†have demonstrated their incompetence and absenteeism over the past decades. Of course, the¬†ANC¬†was the dominant factor, but the so-called moderate¬†Democratic Alliance (DA) and the¬†Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF)¬†of¬†Malema¬†are no better and bear co-responsibility for the failure of the¬†‚ÄėRainbow nation” –¬†said¬† Gerolf Annemans, the president of a Movement for Nations and Freedom (MENF).

“Some, including myself, dare to call it a silent genocide” – Annemans continued, while commenting on the situation with farm murders in South Africa. On¬†day 66 of 2018 there have been more than 84 and 11 murders.

 

Ramaphosa to pursue land grabs

Cyril Ramaphosa, who replaced Jacob Zuma after his plagued by corruption scandals presidency, was cheered in the South African parliament as he pledged to ‚Äúaccelerate our land distribution programme ‚Ķ to redress a grave historical injustice [and] make more land available to our people for cultivation.‚Ä̬† South Africa‚Äôs new president has vowed to pursue the same course as Zimbabwean tyrant Robert Mugabe, expropriating land from white farmers without compensation.

This kind of rhetoric, attempting to find a solution for multiple economic problems in Marxist-Leninist expropriation of wealth in view of distributing it to poor, has already encouraged criminals to murder farmers, making their  profession the most dangerous in the world. (The video below was demonstrated in the European Parliament during the conference on challenges of South Africa #SA2018EU #farmmurders)

A Ramaphosa’s Marxist-leaning African National Congress (ANC) has taken its lead on this issue from the hardline Economic Freedom Fighters led by Julius Malema, a former head of the ANC’s youth wing.

Cyril Ramaphosa presidency inspires hopes

Cyril Ramaphosa has been elected as South Africa’s President in a parliamentary vote on Thursday (15.02.2018) after scandal-ridden Jacob Zuma resigned on orders from the ruling African National Congress.

South Africa’s main stock market index jumped nearly 4% putting it on track for its biggest one-day gain in more than two years as investors welcomed Zuma’s resignation after nine years in office plagued by corruption allegations.

South Africa’s main stock market index jumped nearly 4 percent, putting it on track for its biggest one-day gain in more than two years as investors welcomed Zuma’s resignation after nine years in office plagued by corruption allegations, Reuters agency reports.

However the question remains how Cyril Ramaphosa – the closest ally of plagued with corruption accusations Jacob Zuma, – will change the existing practices and put and “drain the swamp” if he has been for a part of the system.

President Zuma reluctant to step down

South Africa President Jacob Zuma said to SABC news that he had offered to go after June, but objected to the way the issue has been handled, underlining that he was not defying the African National Congress (ANC) party, but he disagreed with its decision to ask him to resign.

“It was very unfair to me that this issue is raised,” Mr.Zuma said. “Nobody has ever provided the reasons. Nobody is saying what I have done.”

Mr Zuma’s decision to keep a grip on power has put him at odds with South Africa’s deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa, the ANC’s new leader and his expected successor.

Hawks police arrests Zuma’s allies

The raid by the Hawks police unit on the family home of the Guptas have been launched day after the ruling African National Congress (ANC) ordered Zuma to step down as head of state after nine years in office dogged by scandal and a stagnant economy.

A dozen heavily armed tactical police blocked off a street leading to the Gupta home in Johannesburg. Police¬† regards the place as a “crime scene”.

Zuma and the Guptas Рa family the Indian-born mogul Рdeny any wrongdoing. However a Gupta brother and a business associate have been arrested by the Hawks. Other family members have agreed to hand themselves over to police.

The Hawks arrested members of the family who they consider to be flight risks. According to different sources recently Atul Gupta became the seventh-wealthiest person in South Africa, with an estimated net worth of more than USD700 million.

President Zuma tries to win time

South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC) has formally asked President Jacob Zuma to resign, according to senior party officials.

The decision to “recall” him “urgently” followed ANC marathon talks on the issue.

Mr Zuma, 75, agreed to step down, but only in the next three to six months, the official added, fueling a suspicion he is maneuvering in attempt to win time, postponing his departure.

Mr Zuma, who has been in power since 2009, has been dogged by corruption allegations. Current crisis is not the first one in his long political career, until present Mr.Zuma has been able to overcome all of them, and stayed as the head of state. Life at brink became his modus vivendi, further degrading the situation in the country lacking genuine political leadership and vision of future.

Resignation pressure on Zuma mounts

The six most heavy-weight officials in South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC) met President Jacob Zuma on Sunday,  February 4, a senior party leader said, amid growing pressure for President to step down.

The party‚Äôs ‚Äútop-six‚ÄĚ leadership team is due to meet Zuma later on Sunday, party secretary-general and top-six member Ace Magashule told local media including news channel eNCA and the City Press newspaper.

Magashule said that the removal of Zuma as President of the country was not on the agenda, differing with reports citing unnamed sources in the City Press and Sunday Times.

Atkinson: South Africa future depends on respect of human rights

Janice ATKINSON MEP OPINION

I am holding the debate on Tuesday, 30th January at 5pm on human rights and the political situation in South Africa after visiting that wonderful country a number of times and being disturbed about the political situation that could see that country descend into chaos after their general elections in 2019.

I witnessed ‚ÄėBlack Monday‚Äô on my last visit where farmers came together to protest against the brutal murder and torture on farmers, their families and their workers, both black and white. These brutal killings, some encouraged by Marxist political leaders who want to nationalise the banks and mines and forcibly take control of the winelands and farms, are truly horrific. Yet no real statistics are kept by the government, numbers are disputed by the state against the victims. Rapes are off the scale ‚Äď 41,000 in 2015/16. ¬†What South Africa and the EU‚Äôs Sweden have in common is they are at the top of the league table as the rape capitals of the world.

I toured the townships, the winelands, went on safari in two regions, toured the Cape and spoke to many people, black and white. All are very afraid (and optimistic) about their future.  From the woman that lives in a one room shack without running water or a toilet, who lives with her three grown sons, who still votes for the ANC because it is the party of Nelson Mandela. Her faith is interesting.  I am not sure the dream of the Rainbow Nation living together in peace as really reached her or the murdered farmers.

I saw wonderful projects where vineyard businesses were housing, educating and employing whole families from the townships.  Many of my drivers were young, ambitious family men who were grateful for the opportunities afforded to them. This is black and white working together.

But that could all change in eighteen months time.

At the last election the ANC secured 60% of the vote (249 seats in parliament), although their constitution only allows for parties to hold 50% of power (but how can you go against the votes of the people?). The official opposition is the Democratic Alliance with 89 seats in parliament and chillingly, third is the violent Marxist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) who advocate wholesale nationalisation, black empowerment by seizure of land and assets and violence against the whites and other minorities.  

As the ANC loses support, many of their supporters are turning to the EFF. On a more positive note some of them are also turning to the Freedom Front Plus (FF+) party (4 seats) because this party seeks to protect the rights of minorities (amongst other policies). Black minority tribes want to preserve their heritage, culture and language and they see the FF+ as the party to secure those rights.  As in Europe, we on the centre right fight to preserve our culture, heritage, language and identity through securing our borders and having the right to determine who can live in our countries.

If this country descends into chaos in 2019 the winelands will be lost, tourism will dry up, the ecosystems of the coast, sea and the conservation projects in the safari lands will be destroyed.  Everything that the EU says it holds dear will descend into another Zimbabwe, but worse.

Last November, when I returned from my last trip to South Africa, I called on the European Parliament to debate the human rights atrocities and political situation in South Africa. It was declined. I turned to my colleagues and said, this place tries to pride itself on upholding human rights and the rule of law. Unfortunately, the Parliament only recognises certain countries’ humans’ rights when it is safe to condemn individual countries or persons for political reasons. But for a country like South Africa where they are desperate to believe in the Rainbow Nation, to think that those now in power, the unfortunate legacy of Nelson Mandela, it is too difficult and ideologically impossible to question its future, its human rights abuses and the lack of rule of law.

Image: courtesy Janice Atkinson in South Africa,  Franschhoek Wine Valley.

Conference SA

« Older Entries