Tag Archives: Tobruk Parliament

UNSC calls Haftar to halt march on Tripoli

United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the G7 are calling on Marshal Khalifa Haftar to halt the advancement of troops on Libya capital Tripoli. (Image above: illustration).

After a closed-door emergency meeting on situation in Libya, the UNSC warned that those responsible for reigniting the conflict would be held to account.

The UN Security Council addressed their call to the Commander Haftar, while ongoing fighting has been reported in Tripoli‘s international airport( 30 km south of the capital).

German Ambassador Christoph Heusgen, who holds the Council presidency called on Libyan National Army (LNA) forces led by Commander Haftar to “halt all military movements” and “on all forces to de-escalate military activity“.

The call of the UNSC is in direct contradiction with the decision of the Tobruk Parliament, endorsing the advancement of the troops on Tripoli to “eliminate terrorists“, who keep hostage the peaceful development of the country. The same message has been delivered by the Commander himself in talks with the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres. Libyan capital has been suffering numerous terrorist attacks, including explosion and burning down of the governmental buildings.

Meanwhile in social media there are new photographs and reports published, illustrating further advancement of Commander Haftar troops, including taking control over Tripoli Airport.

Haftar troops control Tripoli Airport

Libyan Marshal Khalifa Haftar troops took control over Tripoli Airport, Al-Arabiya TV channel reports, quoting a relevant press-release, issued by the Commander. (Image above: illustration).

The march on the capital has been announced as an counter-terrorist operation, which will be ongoing until the terrorists are “eliminated”, the Commander explained to the UN Secretary General  Antonio Guterres. Marshal Haftar march on Libyan capital is endorsed by Tobruk Parliament, the document is available in Arabic language.

France proposes sanctions against Tripoli militias

At  the U.N. Security Council France proposes to implement sanctions on militias involved in ongoing clashes between rival factions Tripoli, which has undermined U.N. efforts to hold elections in Libya by year-end to unite the  country.

More than hundred people have been killed and 400 injured in hostilities between the Seventh Brigade, or Kaniyat, from Tarhouna, a town 65 km southeast of Tripoli, against the Tripoli Revolutionaries’ Brigades (TRB) and the Nawasi, two of the capital’s largest armed groups.

Tripoli and western Libya are lead by a U.N.-backed government mainly supported by armed groups, while Eastern Libya is controlled by a rival administration, supported by Tobruk Parliament.

“In the face of the worsening security situation in Tripoli, there is a responsibility to support the Libyans and that means we must be tougher on those that want to keep the status quo for their benefits,” French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said reporters ahead of a meeting hosted by France on Libya on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly.

In 2013, France opened an investigation into the allegations after French news website Mediapart published reports following the claims by Franco-Lebanese businessman, Ziad Takieddine. Takieddine alleged he transferred €5 million from Gaddafi’s former intelligence chief Abdullah Senussi to the head of Sarkozy’s campaign  –  Claude Gueant.

Eastern Libya to launch its coins

Authorities in eastern Libya will circulate their own coins to ease shortages of money, a central bank official said. Another sign of dichotomy in the country that has two rival governments in east and west:  following ancient Cyrenaica and Tripolitania division.

Reportedly the new coins, made in Russia, will join Russian-made paper currency that has already been issued in the eastern half of the country, which is outside the control of the United Nations backing government based in Tripoli in the west.

Libya, once upon a time one of the richest countries in Africa, has faced a sharp decline in living standards since a 2011 NATO supported revolt, ending in assassination of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

The two rival governments and an array of armed groups are competing for control.

While the UN-backed government in Tripoli has struggled to control territory and make an impact, the east of the country has a separate cabinet with a prime minister, Tobruk parliament,  and a local branch of the central bank.

The new coins worth one Libyan dinar – about 75 US cents at the official rate but less than 12 cents on the black market – would be valid from November 2, replacing banknotes that are mostly worn out, said Ramzi al-Agha, head of the liquidity committee at the eastern central bank branch.

The coins are copper coloured, weigh slightly more than a two-euro coin or a new British pound and feature a picture of a plant native to eastern Libya’s Green Mountains, with the words “Central Bank of Libya”.

 

Colonel Gaddafi’s son liberated by militants

 

Said al-Islam Gaddafi –  the youngest son of the assassinated Colonel Gaddafi (+20.10.2011) the longstanding leader of Libya – has been realised by the supporters of his father, according to sources from Tobruk Parliament.

The mean stream media (MSM) does not inform about the detail of his liberation. According to the BBC sources,  Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, second son of  Col Muammar Gaddafi, is said to have been freed “under an amnesty”. His father’s preferred successor, he had been held by a militia in the town of Zintan for the past six years after Gaddafi’s assassination,

“The death of Muammar Gaddafi on the 20th of October last year in Syrte is one of the questions to be clarified. There is a serious suspicion that this act was one of the war crimes” – said Luis Moreno-Camp the General prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) commenting on the death  (Le Figaro, 16 December 2011). At the moment it is unclear is Saif Al Islam would launch a legal action to investigate the assassination of his father, casting a long shadow on the Western leaders, especially on former French President Nicolas Sarkozy and the UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

The assassination of Colonel Gaddafi lead to collapse of the Libyan state, and taking over of the immense Libyan territories by multiple groups of jihadists  – the consequences the Western leaders have not foreseen, when they started to bombard Libya, violating  the UN resolution 1973. The assassination of Gaddafi, and subsequent collapse of Libyan state became a detonator of an ongoing #migrantcrisis in Europe.