Tag Archives: Sénégal

COVID19 reached Senegal

Senegal reports its second case of coronavirus. The latest patient is an 80-year-old man from a Paris suburb who arrived in Senegal on February 29.

Senegal anti-trafficking measures

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Senegal and the Ministry of Justice, represented by National Unit for Combatting Trafficking in Persons (CNLTP) and the Directorate of Criminal Affairs and Amnesty (DACG), has united efforts to consolidate the country’s first human trafficking case law database, the Système de suivi de la traite, known as Systraite.

https://twitter.com/dev_discourse/status/1187767501456842755?s=21

Senegal is an origin, transit, and destination country for the flows of migrants in West and Central Africa who are the risk group, exposed for various abuses, including human trafficking.

Forced begging is the most common way of exploitation, but also to the other forms as domestic servitude, forced labour in gold mines, and sex slavery. In 2018, 1,100 Senegalese migrants who intended to reach Europe were identified as vulnerable to trafficking in Libya.

Despite Senegal’s considerable efforts to identify and assist trafficking survivors, the country’s taskforce against trafficking in persons (TiP) experiences deficiency of data on survivors, crimes, and traffickers. At present the rudimentary networking and information sharing among local authorities and other means of coordination of efforts across Senegal are impaired.

FGM victims need psychological aid

African survivors of female genital mutilation (FGM) say they are in need of mental health aid, and urged governments and charities to provide support for dealing with long-term trauma.

Survivors and activists from across the continent attending a summit on FGM and child marriage in Senegal this week said mental health should have been on the agenda.

Common in 28 African countries, FGM is often seen as a rite of passage and justified for cultural or religious reasons but can cause chronic pain, infertility and even death.

FGM typically involves the partial or total removal of the external genitalia and is practiced on girls from infancy to adolescence, with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimating about 200 million women and girls have undergone the procedure.

World leaders pledged to end the practice under a set of global goals agreed in 2015.

Cut at 18 against her will, 29-year-old Lekumoisa said she has never received any services to help with the trauma.

 

African Museum “half-celebration”

In spite of the €66 million investment into the renovation of the Africa Museum, and five years of intense reconstruction, for the representatives of Congolese diaspora the re-opening of a new concept institution is just a “half-celebration“, because the  in de-colonisation process should go “much further“.

Developing a new concept of Belgium Africa Museum its leadership invited  Africans themselves from the countries of the continent, and from diaspora to share their narrative, creating a genuine and meaningful platform for the debate, a work in process to reflect the continuous evolution of societies, and cultures towards each other, marking a clear break with the Colonial Palace Museum from the times of King Leopold II.

With this Museum Africa receives the place it merits – Africa existed before the colonization” – Billy Calonji from Congolese diaspora commented, reflecting on complex shared history of Belgium and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). (VIDEO below in French language).

Through decades the Museum has been experiencing a fundamental cultural evolution, moving from West-centered vision of Africa to modern concept of a multi-polar world, and multi-cultural societies. From once upon a time a Colonial Palace with Royal collections of artifacts of Belgium kings it reshaped itself into modern fascinating platform for communications between people, cultures, and  civilizations.

Among precious experiences and metamorphosis of the Museum special place close to the  heart of Africans is kept for the ceremony of commemoration honoring the seven Congolese who did not survive the climate and perished being brought by the King Leopold II for the Universal Exhibition of 1897. A group of  267 Congolese was “imported” to stay in practiced in those days “human zoo”, re-creating life of Bantu tribes in Free State of Congo for the expo visitors.

On the sidelines of the reopening of the Africa Museum scheduled for this Saturday, December 8, a commemorative service has been held at noon in front of the seven graves lined up along the Saint-Jean Church, Tervuren. A week earlier a commemorative plate was installed in the Museum parc  to engrave the memory of those Congolese in a symbolic gesture to mark the place of the exhibition village. “We asked them for pardon, and we hope that the direction the Museum takes, is the way they could have wished”, Mr.Calonji continued.

However the shadows of the past are not able to overwhelm the vibrant future ahead of the Museum as a platform for debate, culture, and African studies which  are assessed as the positive elements by Billy Calonji, who holds in high esteem African diaspora efforts, actively participating in creating a new concept of African Museum, but nevertheless the work should continue even further.

During the renovation works the Museum has developed close relationships with members of African diaspora in Belgium in pursue of a new mindset: a synergy in cooperation within modern multicultural Belgium society, and beyond.

The partnerships with national museum in Rwanda, Musée des civilisations noires in Senegal, the national museum of Congo in Kinshasa, and in Lubumbashi have been developed.

A little bit of patience is needed, while waiting for the opening of the Museum in Kinshasa in Congo” said Mr.Calonji, refereing to the scheduled for the end of 2019 event, awaited by lovers of African art and culture, expecting to bring the dialogue between civilizations to a next stage.

In its engagement to overcome the notorious legacy of Belgium  colonial past, hundreds of artifacts were returned to Africa: to the Institute of National Museums of Congo in Kinshasa, and to the National Museum of Rwanda in Butare, but the work will go on the Director of the Museum Guido Gryseels confirmed. The digitisation of a significant  parts of archive has been undertaken to hand in the originals to Rwanda Museum.

We acknowledge that the moral ownership of the objects is with Africans themselves” said Mr.Gryseels  to international press at the preview visit.

 

 

Hissène Habré emprisonné à perpétuité

Habré
“La chambre africaine extraordinaire d’assises d’appel a confirmé la peine d’emprisonnement à perpétuité pour des crimes contre l’humanité, crimes de guerre et torture infligée par la Chambre africaine extraordinaire d’assises à l’ancien Président tchadien, Hissène Habré, le 30 mai 2016,” – a dit la Déclaration du porte-parole SEAE sur la décision de la Chambre africaine extraordinaire d’assises d’appel dans le cadre du procès d’Hissène Habré.

“Ce verdict en appel termine de manière définitive un procès historique, qui constitue un précédent important pour la justice internationale et la lutte contre l’impunité en Afrique mais aussi dans le monde.”
“Les autorités sénégalaises ont montré une réelle détermination pour mener à bien ce procès, de même que  les associations des familles de victimes et Human Rights Watch.”
“L’UE a constamment soutenu et contribué, aux côtés de l’Union Africaine, du Sénégal et du Tchad, à la tenue de ce procès.”