Tag Archives: Pretoria

South Africa urban violence outbreak

South African police  have arrested dozens of people in Johannesburg on September 2 after rioters looted shops, burned tyres and blocked road junctions – the second outbreak of urban rioting in a week. (Image: Johannesburg).

Police had no answer what exactly had triggered the violence, however it is generally considered that the social context has deteriorated: unemployment at close to 30%, widespread poverty and income disparities have all been blamed for recent outbreaks and attacks on immigrants.

Last week, hundreds of protesters in the administrative capital Pretoria set fire to buildings, looted mostly foreign-owned businesses and clashed with police, who started to fire rubber bullets at the crowds in attempt to stop further devastation.

Taxi drivers issued an alert to commuters asking them to avoid Pretoria downtown.

However, Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama said Nigerian shops had been targeted by “mindless criminals” and promised to take “definitive measures“.

NGO sues SA government over pollution

A lawsuit filed by environmental and community groups accuses South Africa’s government in failure to resolve the problem of high air pollution levels in an area which is site of coal-fired power stations and refineries.

The case filed in the Pretoria High Court claims the government has violated the Constitutional right to a healthy environment for inhabitants of the densely-polluted Highveld Priority Area. It was brought by environmental justice group @groundWorkSA and community organisation Vukani Environmental Justice Movement in Action.

Africa’s most advanced economy is generating most of its energy from coal-fired power plants that emit millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

Image above: illustration

 

 

 

 

Kevin Richardson – lion’s buddy

 

Kevin Richardson (42) manages a wildlife area with 31 lions within the Dinokeng reserve north of South Africa’s capital, Pretoria. Many of the lions, which were captive-bred and cannot be released into the wild, were rescued from being transferred to operations that would let customers shoot them, he said.

 Richardson insists that he does not breed lions and that those on his 1,300-hectare (3,200-acre) property feed on donated carcasses of cattle and antelope.

“I have been accepted as part of the pride,” said Richardson, scratching the lion Bayetsi’s chin. “But I have to be very careful. They are large animals and are very good at telling you how they feel.”