Tag Archives: police

ZAMBIA: EU calls for investigation

Brussels, 24.12.2020 “On Wednesday 23 December, Zambian Police dispersed a large group of supporters of the opposition by use of force. Two people are confirmed to have died. The EU expresses its condolences to their families” says the statement of the spokesperson of the European External Action Service – the official body of the the EU diplomacy.

The Inspector General of Police has committed to investigate the circumstances of these events. The investigation – conducted according to the laws of Zambia – should be comprehensive and open to scrutiny. This is especially important as Zambia approaches an election year, where respect for the Rule of Law and the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms will be critical for an inclusive, transparent and credible process.

The EU reaffirms the importance it attaches to its partnership with Zambia, a force for peace and stability in Southern Africa, and with the Zambian people”.

EU-DRC: €20m for police reform

Brussels, 16.11.2020 The European Union (EU) is maintaining its commitment to the security of the people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by earmarking €20 million from the 11th European Development Fund for the Police Reform Support Programme over five years. This brings EU support for police reform up to a total of €60 million.

“There can be no development and sustainable growth without a more peaceful environment. That is why the European Union is stepping up its support for security, peace and stability in the DRC. We are therefore backing the DRC’s government in its determination to continue the security, defence and justice reforms now under way, with full respect for human rights” European Commissioner for International Partnerships, Jutta Urpilainen, said.

The resumption of police reform is of paramount importance to increasing public confidence in the security forces and supporting the rule of law throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

This new European aid programme is aimed at improving governance, protection for human rights and efforts to combat impunity and corruption. It has four specific objectives: improving the implementation of reforms and the accountability of the police; increasing the professionalism of the police and the criminal justice chain; improving human resource management; and, lastly, getting community policing up and running in order to restore public confidence.

Given the importance of recognising the equality of men and women and combating gender-based violence, including sexual violence, particular attention will be paid to gender issues.

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the European Union has been a long-standing partner, having provided a total of €670 million from the 11th European Development Fund for the period 2014-2020.

The priority sectors for European aid in the DRC are health, sustainable agriculture and the environment, infrastructure and governance, including defence, policing, justice and public finances.

The support programmes for the security sector, and more specifically the police, have contributed decisively to the implementation of police reform in the DRC, as highlighted by the creation of the Police Reform Monitoring Committee; the drafting of a framework act on the Congolese National Police (PNC) and strategic plans for the implementation of the reform; the creation of a database of police officers; the modernisation of the administration and the creation and construction of a police academy (ACAPOL).

This support has helped professionalise the police, paving the way for a civilian police force that is impartial and at the service of the community.

The EU support for security in the country follows on from the EUPOL DRC mission carried out from 2007 to 2014 as part of the common security and defence policy (CSDP), the first and second phases of the police reform support programmes financed by the EDF (€35 million) and the Congolese National Police reform support programme implemented from 2006 to 2020 with funding from the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (€5 million).

South Africa: 58 murders daily

The number of homicides rose by 1.4% to 21,325 in the 12 months through March — an average of 58 a day — the police service said in its annual crime-statistics report.

The murder rate of 36 per 100,000 people was little changed from the previous year and compares with an international average of seven per 100,000. The number of rapes, sexual offenses and car hi-jackings also increased, but property-related crime declined.

“We are not where we want to be,” Police Minister Bheki Cele said at a briefing in Pretoria, the capital. “However we are pleased with the improvements in most stubborn crime categories.”

Violent crime is fueled by widespread alcohol and drug abuse, and perpetrators often know their victims, the police data show. A lockdown imposed to curb the spread of the virus should have a positive impact on the current year’s statistics, with preliminary data showing it helped curtail homicides and other crimes.

South Africa urban violence outbreak

South African police  have arrested dozens of people in Johannesburg on September 2 after rioters looted shops, burned tyres and blocked road junctions – the second outbreak of urban rioting in a week. (Image: Johannesburg).

Police had no answer what exactly had triggered the violence, however it is generally considered that the social context has deteriorated: unemployment at close to 30%, widespread poverty and income disparities have all been blamed for recent outbreaks and attacks on immigrants.

Last week, hundreds of protesters in the administrative capital Pretoria set fire to buildings, looted mostly foreign-owned businesses and clashed with police, who started to fire rubber bullets at the crowds in attempt to stop further devastation.

Taxi drivers issued an alert to commuters asking them to avoid Pretoria downtown.

However, Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama said Nigerian shops had been targeted by “mindless criminals” and promised to take “definitive measures“.

Shia Muslim clashes close to Nigeria National Assembly

On July 9 Nigeria’s National Assembly was on lockdown after shots were heard outside during clashes between police and a group of Shi’ite Muslim protesters.

The involved in violent clashes blamed each other for the shooting. In a statement, police clarified two officers were shot and wounded in the legs, and six other officers were injured by individuals using clubs and stones.

Police used tear gas on the protesters and smoke could be seen rising from the area.

The Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN), a group that represents Nigerian minority Shia Muslims tried to enter the complex, provoking the confrontation with police units.

One of the four injured policemen beaten up by Shi’ite protesters during a violent invasion of the National Assembly, Umar Abdulahi, a dergeant, has died.

 

Uganda kidnappers demand $500,000 ransom

An American citizen who was kidnapped with her driver at Uganda’s most popular wildlife park by gunmen had failed to take an armed ranger as required by the park’s regulations, a spokesperson for the wildlife authority said.

Four armed men in Uganda‘s Queen Elizabeth National Park. according to CNN have used the victim’s phone to demand $500,000 ransom.

We strongly believe this ransom is the reason behind the kidnap,” a police officer said to CNN TV channel. They were ambushed and kidnapped near Katoke Gate between 5 pm and 7 pm on April, 2. “Other four tourists who were left abandoned and unharmed later contacted the base (lodge) and were quickly got safely out of any danger,” a press release said.

The Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) is Uganda’s most visited wildlife attraction.

Kimberley Sue Endecott (35), and Ugandan driver Jean Paul were on a game drive in the Park when four gunmen ambushed their vehicle in evening hours, police said. However, an elderly couple also at the scene were not taken and raised the alarm.

Militant groups as Somali Islamists or Congolese-based rebels operate in Uganda, but none of the group claimed responsibility for the armed incident. At present the regular crime is regarded as a privileged version of the assault.

There is ongoing police operation, however for the evident reasons, the details are not revealed.

BBC journalists arrested in Uganda

Police arrested a team of the BBC journalists in Uganda for illegal possession of prescription drugs, but the country’s government spokesman said the reporters had been helping to expose corruption, and demanded their immediate release.

Patrick Onyango, the police spokesman, said five suspects had been detained overnight. They included two Ugandans and one Kenyan, the wife of a local journalist from NBS Television who was working with them, and a driver.

Fourteen boxes of tablets had been seized, along with other vaccines.

Government spokesman Ofwono Opondo said the journalists had been cooperating with the State House Health Monitoring Unit to investigate the theft and sale of Ugandan government drugs in  South Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo.

“I am yet to find out the logic why police arrested these journalists, who in my view were helping government to unearth the rot which is in the system,” said Opondo. “They should be released unconditionally.”

The BBC confirmed it was in contact with the authorities over the case.

AMENDED: 8/02/2019 

Uganda police frees BBC journalists arrested over possession of drugs.

Bomb explosion at Cairo Coptic Church

A policeman perished, while attempting to defuse a bomb outside a Coptic Christian church in Egypt, security officials said.

Late Mustafa Abid was reportedly a specialist in mine clearance. The explosion injured two other officers and one pedestrian.

The device was hidden in a bag on a roof by the church in Nasr City outside Cairo.

Coptic Christmas is celebrated on January 7, following non-recognition of the canon of the Catholic Church (1582) Gregorian calendar reform.

Arrests of protesters in Tunisia

Tunisian authorities have arrested 18 people in the wake of protests that erupted after the suicide of a journalist who set himself on fire to protest economic problems officials said.

Among arrested 13 are from the provincial city of Kasserine and five others from Tebourba, near Tunis, Interior Ministry spokesman Sofiane Zaag said.

The most violent protests erupted in Kasserine, in west central Tunisia, where police used tear gas to disperse violent demonstrators throwing stones. According to ShemsFM radio, the military was deployed to reinforce police to deal with the protests and secure state buildings.

Wounded and killed Oromos in Ethiopia

Killed and wounded people by security forces in eastern Ethiopia at the weekend were reported by senior regional official.

“The victims were all ethnic Oromos. The perpetrators were members of a paramilitary force,” said Negeri Lencho, spokesman for the Oromiya state administration.

The area has been plagued by instability. At present 37 killed and 44 wounded are reported by Addis media, all of them from Oromia region.

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