Tag Archives: Nigeria

Cameroon: Islamists attack refugee camp

Islamist group Boko Haram is suspected to be responsible for killing of 15 people and leaving the other six wounded in a grenade attack on a camp for displaced people in northern Cameroon on Sunday,August 2, a local official told. The village is located in the Mozogo district, close to the Nigerian border in the Far North region.

In the early hours, assailants threw a grenade into a group of sleeping people inside the camp in the village of Nguetchewe, said district mayor, Medjeweh Boukar. At present the camp is hosting around 800 people, he said.

Boukar was informed by the camp residents that 15 people had died. A security official confirmed the attack and the death toll. The wounded were taken to a nearby hospital, they added. The image of mourners around a grave appeared on social media.

“The attackers arrived with a woman who carried the grenade into the camp,” Boukar said, underlinging that women and children were among the victims.

Over the past month there have been twenty incursions and attacks by suspected Islamist militants, Boukar said.

The other Boko Haram suspect attack took place in State Borno, Nigeria, on July 30.

Boko Haram has been fighting for a decade to establish an Islamic caliphate on the territory of Nigeria. «6 people killed, 27 wounded by 4 explosives fired into Borno state capital #Maiduguri, by suspected #BokoHaram insurgents yesterday 30 Jul, #Nigeria police reports. Attack, following failed attempt to invade army barracks 13 Jul, is 2nd major breach of city’s security in 3 weeks» wrote on his Twitter micro blog Nnamdi Obasi, the senior adviser for International Crisis group from Nigeria.

The violence, which has cost the lives of 30,000 people and displaced millions more, has frequently spilled over into neighbouring Cameroon, Niger and Chad.

Image above: social media

EU on COVID19 in Nigeria

“Attacks, abductions and killings of civilians by armed groups in northern Nigeria have killed over 160 people including 130 civilians since 28 May. Such heinous acts of terrorism and violence are intolerable. These attacks pose a serious threat to Nigeria’s security and to that of the wider region, including in the increasingly restive Northwest of the country” read the text of the Declaration of the top EU diplomat Josep Borrell and Commissioner for Crisis Management Janez Lenarčič on the latest attacks.

“The ongoing conflict, growing food insecurity and COVID-19 pandemic significantly increase humanitarian needs in northeast Nigeria. International humanitarian law must be safeguarded and respected by all parties to the conflict, in Nigeria and elsewhere. Civilian and humanitarian personnel should not be targeted, and all parties should facilitate unimpeded passage of humanitarian relief for civilians in need.

“The EU stands by Nigeria and its people in this period of increased violence and instability”.

Nigeria 40% population in poverty

Nigeria National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), in a report monitoring poverty and inequality from September 2018 to October 2019, said 40% of people in the country lived below its poverty line of 137,430 naira ($381.75) per year. It signifies that it represents 82.9 million people of the most populaous country in Africa.

Nigeria is the top oil exporter in Africa, which has generated wealth related to crude sales that account for more than half of government revenue. But a failure to diversify the economy and build much needed transport and power infrastructure has retained growth and the spread of wealth beyond a rich elite.

Rapid population growth exceeds economic growth, which stands at around 2%. The United Nations (UN) estimates that Nigeria will have a population of 400 million ihnabitant by 2050.

Nigeria was already struggling to shake off the impact of a 2016 recession before the new coronavirus pandemic hit economies worldwide.

Nigeria is a multi-ethnic and culturally diverse federation which is formed by 36 autonomous states and the Federal Capital Territory.

Inequality in terms of income and opportunities has been progressing rapidly and has affected poverty reduction. The North-South divide has widened in recent years due to the Boko Haram insurgency and a lack of economic development in the northern part of the country.

Large pockets of Nigeria’s population still live in extreme poverty, without adequate access to basic services, and could benefit from more inclusive development policies. The lack of job opportunities is at the core of the high poverty levels, of regional inequality, and of social and political unrest in the country.

COVID19: Nigeria prisons relief

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has asked the chief judge to free prisoners who have been awaiting trial for six years or more for relief of the overcrowded cells as the coronavirus pandemic spreads, a spokesman said on April 21.

A statement quoted Buhari as saying 42% of 74,000 prisoners were awaiting trial. The President urged Chief Judge Ibrahim Tanko Muhammad to reduce that number “since physical distancing and self-isolation in such conditions are practically impossible”.

Buhari said inmates with no confirmed criminal cases against them, elderly prisoners and those who were terminally ill could be discharged.

Most of these custodial centres are presently housing inmates beyond their capacities and the overcrowded facilities pose a potent threat to the health of the inmates and the public in general in view of the present circumstances, hence the need for urgent steps to bring the situation under control,” Buhari said.

Two weeks ago, the President pardoned 2,600 prisoners who were either 60 or older, terminally ill, or had less than six months left to serve of sentences of three years or more.

Nigeria is Africa’s most populous country, with some 200 million people. On April 20 it said it had registered 665 cases of the coronavirus and 22 related deaths.

Its measures to stop the spread of the virus include closing its borders and locking down the capital Abuja, the commercial hub, Lagos, and the adjacent state, Ogu

COVID19: Nigeria Abba Kyari died

“The Presidency regrets to announce the passage of the Chief of Staff to the President, Mallam Abba Kyari,” spokesman Garba Shehu said on Twitter. Kyari had been hospitalized in the Nigeria commercial capital, Lagos, after testing positive for the coronavirus upon his return from a trip to Germany on March 15.

Mallam Abba Kyari, chief of staff to Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari and an ardent supporter of state intervention in the economy, has died as a result of coronavirus illness. His age wasn’t disclosed. Born in the northeastern state of Borno, Kyari obtained degrees in sociology and law and attended the International Institute for Management Development in Switzerland. He became chief executive officer of the United Bank for Africa Plc and served on the boards of both Unilever Nigeria Plc and Exxon Mobil Corp.’s Nigerian unit. He never disclosed his age or date of birth. However Nigerians in social media claim that he was 82 years old, the life releavnt to his long and impressive career.

Buhari, 77, tested negative for the coronavirus last month after Kyari symptons emerged. The number of infections in Nigeria have doubled to 493, with April 17 recording the highest number of confirmed cases in a day following an increase in testing. Africa’s most populous country has so far recorded 17 deaths from the illness.

Kyari, who was appointed to the position in 2015, was widely regarded as Buhari’s most trusted ally, he ravelled to London last year to get Buhari to sign new oil legislation into law, bypassing Vice President Yemi Osinbajo and acting as de facto Prime minister of Africa’s biggest oil producer.

COVID19: Nigeria security kills imposing restricitons

Security personnel in Nigeria have killed at least 18 people enforcing restrictions introduced to stop the spread of coronavirus, ThisDay reported, citing a report by the National Human Rights Commission. (Image: illustration)

Nigerian security agents have killed people in their enforcement of measures to curb coronavirus, a figure higher than the documented toll inflicted by the disease, the country’s human rights group said.

Africa’s most populous nation (200M) has imposed a total lockdown in city Lagos and the capital Abuja and set restrictions in other regions in a bid to contain the virus.

According to official figures, in Nigeria 407 infection cases have been established, and among them 12 resulted in deaths of the patients.

COVID19: 139 confirmed cases

On April 1 there had been 139 confirmed coronavirus cases and two deaths in Nigeria. Nine people have recovered after contracting virus Covid-19. Both major cities Lagos and Abuja along with Ogun State are currently in lockdown.

Regrettably, we also had our first fatality, a former employee of PPMC, who died on 23rd March 2020. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family in this very difficult time. We also pray for quick recovery for those infected and undergoing treatment” President Muhamaddu Buhari wrote on his Twitter microblog page.

“…Without compromising our social distancing policies. The Minister will be contacting the affected States and agree on detailed next steps” the President continued.

At present health insurance system in Nigeria functions is devided in health care provided in different types: general financed for all citizens, health care provided by government through a special health insurance scheme for government employees and private firms entering contracts with private health care providers.

Nigeria’s healthcare system is plagued with chronic underfunding and limited infrastructure, and even in normal circumstances, many Nigerians have difficulty accessing healthcare. But people who are chained are likely to get little or no necessary healthcare, despite being at extreme risk, Human Rights Watch reports, commenting possible consequences of pandemic on Nigerians.

“As organisation, our area of specialization is health system strengthening and we can confidently say that Nigeria’s healthcare system is not strong. It is important that each state takes ownership to build the infrastructure in terms of building and equipping and capacity of healthcare workers so that they can be able to provide the necessary care” said Country Director of PharmAccess Foundation, Njide Ndili who has expressed concern over the quality of healthcare infrastructure in Nigeria. He suggested “…each state takes complete ownership of healthcare services”.

About 90 million people, a half of Nigeria’s population live in extreme poverty, according to estimates from thea number of international organisations.

As illustration of the dramatic situation of Nigerian extreme poor, their numbers acceded population of entire Germany.

High fertility rate has been consistently reported in Nigeria. The three major ethnic groups in Nigeria, Hausa/Fulani, Igbo, and Yoruba have different socio-cultural identities particularly those that relate to fertility but fertility index is often reported at the national level. Nigeria is currently the 7thmost populous countries worldwide and by 2050 projection, the country will be the 4th most populous country globally reaching figure of 400 million inhabitants.

No expulsions of Nigerians took place

A hundred African Facebook pages posted information about “51 Congolese were expelled from France” on March 1 after incidents two days earlier in Paris, on the sidelines of a concert by Congolese star singer Fally Ipupa. (Image: Paris, Gare de Lyon before fire).

This is false: no case of eviction has been recorded by the Congolese authorities, no plane from France landed in Kinshasa on Sunday and the photos accompanying these claims date back several years.

Nigeria: Dozens killed in Kaduna

More than 50 civilians were killed on Sunday evening in six villages in Kaduna province of Nigeria in an attack which started March 1 afternoon.
The mlitiary opearation of Nigerian ground forces and aviation is ongoing.

Image: social media.

MEPs criticise Nigeria and Burundi

16.01.2020 Strasbourg The European Parliament adopted two resolutions on monitoring respect to the human rights and rule of law situation in Nigeria and Burundi.

Nigeria

Following the recent terrorist attacks in the country, the European Parliament strongly condemns the repeated violations of human rights and international and humanitarian law, ‘’whether based on religion or ethnicity’’. MEPs urge the Nigerian authorities to guarantee respect for human rights and to protect the civilian population from terrorism and violence. The fight against impunity is fundamental to the stability of the country and to building lasting peace, MEPs say.

The situation in Nigeria has significantly deteriorated over the last few years, posing a serious threat to international and regional security. Recent killings are part of a wider series of terrorist acts, including the attack on 24 December 2019 on a village near Chibok that resulted in the death of seven villagers and the kidnapping of a teenage girl.

The text was adopted by show of hands. For more details, the full resolution will be available here (16.01.2020).

Burundi

MEPs strongly condemn the current restrictions on freedom of expression in Burundi, including the limitations placed on public freedom, large-scale violations of human rights, the intimidation and arbitrary arrests of journalists and broadcast bans. They recall that Burundi is bound by the human rights clause of the Cotonou agreement and therefore urge the country’s authorities to immediately revert this abusive trend and to uphold its human rights obligations.

Civil society and journalists play a vital role in a democratic society, MEPs say, particularly in the context of upcoming elections in Burundi. The European Parliament calls on the Burundian authorities to stop intimidating, harassing, and arbitrarily arresting journalists, human rights activists and members of the opposition, including those returning from exile.

Image above: MEP Assita KANKO, Strasbourg Plenary.

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