Tag Archives: Muslim

Meghan starring as «part-time féminist»

Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, danced with a group of mentors who teach vulnerable youngsters from townships to swim and surf. However the international attention was attracted to their visit to South Africa’s oldest mosque – Auwal Mosque in Bo-Kaap in Cape Town – on September 24, the second day of their Africa tour. Meghan Markle stepped out of the car wearing headscarf and floor-length dress, disguised in Prophet worshiper. The couple were met by Imam Sheikh Ismail Londt and Muslim community leader Mohamed Groenwald.

The royals visited the Waves for Change project, which grew from a small surfing club started in Masiphumelele township in 2009, and which is intended to help young people from violent communities to develop trust and confidence through sports and recreation at Monwabisi beach .

UK media has interpreted Meghan Markle debut in scarf as a sign of respect to Muslim worshipers, reminding of Princess Diana appearance in headscarf at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, in 1996. However they have completely omitted the evolution of the public perception of Islam of after 11/9.

The Muslim outfit of Meghan Markle in floor length dress and headscarf has also caused indignation of feminists, and all those who strive for gender equality in Muslim societies. Social media dubbed the Duchess as a “part-time feminist“, or “Royal feminist”.

https://twitter.com/bobbelvedere/status/1176548109205364737?s=21

Shia Muslim clashes close to Nigeria National Assembly

On July 9 Nigeria’s National Assembly was on lockdown after shots were heard outside during clashes between police and a group of Shi’ite Muslim protesters.

The involved in violent clashes blamed each other for the shooting. In a statement, police clarified two officers were shot and wounded in the legs, and six other officers were injured by individuals using clubs and stones.

Police used tear gas on the protesters and smoke could be seen rising from the area.

The Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN), a group that represents Nigerian minority Shia Muslims tried to enter the complex, provoking the confrontation with police units.

One of the four injured policemen beaten up by Shi’ite protesters during a violent invasion of the National Assembly, Umar Abdulahi, a dergeant, has died.

 

Al-Shabaab expands into Kenya

Somali radical Islam insurgents are making their own explosives, according to a confidential U.N. report explaining their frequent and deadly attacks.

The Somali al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorist group al-Shabab extends attacks beyond borders, by recruiting new members outside Somali clans, luring them with promises of money and gifts.

In the beginning of this year an assault on an office and hotel complex in Nairobi (Kenya), was the first to be led by non-ethnic Somalis since al-Shabab began major cross-border operations in 2010.

Ali Salim Gichunge, nicknamed Farouk (26) leading Nairobi attacks was a Kenyan who attended a Catholic school and whose mainly Christian ethnic group Meru has no ties to Somalia.

Farouk is by no means exception among a growing number of Kenyans with no ethnic links to Somalia recruited by the militants in recent years, according to relatives, security officials and analysts.

Widespread poverty and unemployment create a nourishing ground for al-Shabaab recruiters offering cash or even just promises of work, researchers who interviewed defectors from the group report. The relatives of the young men said, even small gifts would work for engaging them.

“In the past, the security forces concentrated their efforts in parts of the country that are Muslim majority, Muslim-dominated,” said Murithi Mutiga, a project director for the International Crisis Group think-tank, he added that, “now it’s much harder because al-Shabab has shown its adaptability by recruiting from outside the traditional areas.”

As well al-Shabab has expanded its operations from Somalia into East Africa, where it has hit high-profile targets, such as the offices of Western multinational companies.

EU expresses condolences to victims of Mali attack

The massacre of more than 130 people, including women and children, and the destruction of the village of Ogossagou this Saturday morning by armed men dressed as traditional hunters raises the greatest indignation of the European Union. Immediate measures to ensure the security and protection of populations in central Mali, and in particular Fulani villages, are needed. This includes the disarmament and dismantling of all militias in the region” says the text of the declaration of the European External Actions Service (EEAS) spokesperson. (Image above: illustration)

“The EU extends its condolences to the families of the victims of this attack and to the people of Mali who deserve to live in peace. It urges the authorities to conduct a full investigation of these abuses and to prosecute the perpetrators, otherwise insecurity will continue, the rule of law will recede and tensions between communities will continue to pose extremely serious risks to the stability of the country. country.”

“The European Union and the international community stand with Mali to support the government’s efforts for security, stability and to ensure the redeployment of the state and basic services to the people in the center of the country.”

Central Africa signs peace deal

Central African Republic concluded a peace deal with 14 armed groups on following two weeks of talks in Khartoum, Sudan.

The peace deal was announced by the African Union but the terms were not immediately released.

Central African Republic has been tormented by violence since 2013 when Selaka rebels ousted President Francois Bozize, stirring conflict between Muslim and Christian militias. United Nations peacekeepers were deployed in 2014, however their numbers were not sufficient to end the ongoing violence.

 

Sudan conducts arrests of opposition leaders

Nine opposition leaders and activists have been arrested in Sudan, a group of civil society groups said, the move took place ahead of the expected anti-government protests foreseen after weekly Muslim prayers.

The head of the media office at the National Intelligence and Security Service denied any involvement.

Sudan has been caught in turmoil of more than a week of anti-government protests sparked by degrading living conditions, rising prices, shortages of basic commodities and a cash crisis.

At least 19 people died during the protests, including two military personnel, however till present the exact number of victims is unknown. However, Amnesty international claimed 37 people already lost their lives, and toll of casualties of clashes between protesters, and military is continuing to rise.

A committee of groups of professionals involved in the protests said in a statement that authorities had raided a meeting of opposition leaders in Khartoum. They detained a total of nine people, including Siddiq Youssef, a prominent member of Sudan’s Communist Party, along with the leaders from the pan-Arab Ba’ath and Nasserist parties, the statement said.

The raid followed after calls for continuation of protests after the weekly noon prayers on Friday, December 28.

Buhari blames unnamed politicians for massacre in Plateau State

After violent clashes in central Nigeria between Muslim herders and Christian farmers, occuring during weekend media is citing police informing that 86 people were killed. The growing conflict between two groups has become deadlier than Nigeria’s Boko Haram extremist insurgency.

Following the massacre Nigeria’s president in a statement accused unnamed politicians of taking advantage of the chaos ahead of next year’s elections, calling it “incredibly unfortunate.”

Dramatic footage showed people in rage waving machetes and sticks and shouting at passing security forces as they weaved around overturned and burning vehicles.

President Muhammadu Buhari warned against reprisal attacks after the “deeply unfortunate killings across a number of communities”, while the military, police and counterterror units were sent to end the bloodshed. “No efforts will be spared” to find the attackers, Buhari vowed.

Nigeria’s government said “scores” were killed but did not announce a death toll. The independent Channels Television cited a Plateau State police spokesman, Mathias Tyopev, as saying 86 people had been killed, with at least 50 houses destroyed.

Nigeria has a population of 180 million with 87 million people living in extreme poverty. Since 1999, farmer-herder violence has killed thousands of people and displaced tens of thousands more. It followed a trend in the increase of farmer-herder conflicts throughout much of the western Sahel.

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