Tag Archives: jihad

Mali: Barkhane operation continues

The French General Staff informed about an operation carried out from 25 July to 3 August 2019  in Mali by Barkhane  and the Malian Armed Forces, underlining “the ability and determination of the Malian soldiers to fight alongside Barkhane“.

The 4,500 French troops deployed in former French colonies for ‘Operation Barkhane’ face huge logistical challenges in hostile terrain. The major difficulty is cooperation with a civilian population spread haphazardly across vast and remote spaces, often either sympathetic to the Islamists or terrified of informing about them.

In Gossi, a plagued by Islamic State fighters next to the borders with Burkina Faso and Niger, the town’s local government Councillor had fled after being threatened and found refuge in the Malian base, according to the French Commander.

Operation Barkhane was launched in the wake of Operation Serval, a French offensive that pushed back Tuareg rebels and allied Islamists from northern Mali’s vast desert in 2013.

While Serval had brought moderate stability to northern Mali, unrest had spread to the country’s more populated center, with attacks also reaching neighboring Burkina Faso, Niger and even Ivory Coast.

With no end date announced at its launch, the follow-up operation would try to stabilise countries in the region by assisting their governments in a West African anti-terrorism force. Five years on, no end is in sight.

“We have a dogged adversary, who is tough, drawing from a breeding ground that is favourable to him because the population is isolated,” Colonel Nicolas James, Commander of Desert Tactical Croup Belleface.

Today the radical Islam is actively exploiting modern means of communications, that is why patrol has to search not only for weapons, but also for propaganda in smartphones. When conducting operations, they have to screen the content of smartphones of locals to detect incriminating  jihad propaganda.

On a rare trip with the French troops into central Mali, Reuters journalists were searching for answers why a five-year-old mission, initially planned as a short-term operation to hand over to local forces, may have many more years left to run.

Back in 2018 the Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces, General François Lecointre said: “I do not think that it is possible to solve the problem in Mali in less than ten to fifteen years, if we can at all. The evolution of the situation in Mali is not satisfactory and we will not leave tomorrow, leaving it in stagnation“.

The Barkhane operation relays on €600 millions a year funding.

In spite of being ranked as the third largest in Africa resource of gold, Mali remains of the poorest countries in the world, dependent on international aid. Main gold mines, Sadiola and Morila still constitute the model, which is named “gold-dependent economy”, providing the state with more than a half of export revenue. The average wage in Mali is around a euro per day, and more than half of the population currently lives below poverty line.

 

26 dead in Al-Shabaab Asasey hotel attack

A suicide bomber drove a car loaded with explosives into the Asasey hotel in the port of Kismayo, Somalia, followed by the gunmen, who stormed popular among travelers location. Radical Islam militants of al-Shabab have claimed the attack, the most devastating act of jihad in Kismayo since fighters were forced out in 2012. (Image above: illustration).

Famous TV presenter Hodan Naleyah (43), and her husband Farid were among the victims. A local politician, three Kenyans, three Tanzanians, two Americans and one Briton among the killed, the authorities confirmed.

Al-Shabab, affiliated to al Qaeda terrorist group, often uses car bombs to infiltrate heavily fortified targets like the hotel in Kismayo, which has enjoyed relative calm since 2012.

Daul expresses condolences to Tunisia

The president of the European People’s Party (@EPP) Joseph Daul expressed his condolences after terrorist attack in Tunis: “Very saddened by the attack today in #Tunis. My thoughts are with the families of the victims. This tragedy is a painful reminder of the risks that police forces face in ensuring our safety”.

This week two suicide blasts have shocked the capital of Tunisia, killing at least one police officer and wounding several people.

The first explosion on June 27 involved a suicide bomber who targeted a police patrol on Tunis downtown in Charles de Gaulle Street, close to French embassy building.

One police officer was killed, and another was wounded, according to the interior ministry statement. Three civilians were injured, however there was no further detail on gravity of their wounds.

Body parts were seen on the road around the police car, an AFP news agency reported.

A second jihadist committed suicide attack shortly afterwards on a national guard base in the capital’s al-Qarjani district, the interior ministry said. Four security personnel were wounded in that attack.

 

IS claims Magumeri killings

Islamic State (IS) terrorist group killed 10 Nigerian soldiers in an assault on the northeastern town of Magumeri, the group claimed through related news agency AMAQ. 

The organization leading jihad said the attack on the soldiers took place in the town in northeastern Borno state on May, 1. It published atrocious pictures of burned barracks and dead bodies claiming they are from the site.

Fighters from the Islamic State West Africa Province faction of Boko Haram in trucks and on motorcycles stormed into the base in the town of Magumeri,   around 40 km (25 miles) northwest of Borno state capital Maiduguri,   AFP reported.

Several sources in Nigeria, including one military, confirmed the killings, adding that the fighters stormed the town at roughly 1745 local time (1645 GMT), overran military personnel and raided local shops.

Tuaregs killed in Menaka region

More than 40 people from the Tuareg community have been killed in two separate attacks by suspected jihadist offensive in north-eastern Mali, officials say. Majority of the victims were young men.

The attacks happened in the remote Menaka region on Thursday(26/04) and Friday (27/04).

They are believed to have been carried out in an act of revenge after Tuareg attacks on jihadist camps in recent weeks.

Much of north-eastern Mali is turmoil despite a 2015 peace deal between the government and Tuareg rebels and the presence of an international force.

Tuaregs seized parts of the region, including the African World Heritage city of Timbuktu, in 2012, claiming their ‘historic’ rights on the area.

Later the territories were later taken over by Islamist fighters linked to al-Qaeda, until they were repelled in a French-led military operation in 2013.

 

Italy dismantels jihadist network

Italian police arrested five Maghrebins as part of  a major operation against suspected supporters of Islamist terrorism in central and southern Italy. Previously a teacher, indoctrinating children with martyrdom ideology was also arrested in counter-terrorism operation.

“A vast anti-terrorism operation” was being carried out by special investigation forces based in Rome and region, namely in the nearby town of Latina, police said in a statement.

 The five Tunisians detained are suspected of being part of a broader network connected to Anis Amri, the other migrant from Tunis who killed 12 people when he drove a truck into a Christmas market in Berlin (2016).

Amri was shot dead by Italian police near Milan four days after the Berlin attack.

 

Colonel Gaddafi’s son liberated by militants

 

Said al-Islam Gaddafi –  the youngest son of the assassinated Colonel Gaddafi (+20.10.2011) the longstanding leader of Libya – has been realised by the supporters of his father, according to sources from Tobruk Parliament.

The mean stream media (MSM) does not inform about the detail of his liberation. According to the BBC sources,  Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, second son of  Col Muammar Gaddafi, is said to have been freed “under an amnesty”. His father’s preferred successor, he had been held by a militia in the town of Zintan for the past six years after Gaddafi’s assassination,

“The death of Muammar Gaddafi on the 20th of October last year in Syrte is one of the questions to be clarified. There is a serious suspicion that this act was one of the war crimes” – said Luis Moreno-Camp the General prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) commenting on the death  (Le Figaro, 16 December 2011). At the moment it is unclear is Saif Al Islam would launch a legal action to investigate the assassination of his father, casting a long shadow on the Western leaders, especially on former French President Nicolas Sarkozy and the UK Prime Minister Tony Blair.

The assassination of Colonel Gaddafi lead to collapse of the Libyan state, and taking over of the immense Libyan territories by multiple groups of jihadists  – the consequences the Western leaders have not foreseen, when they started to bombard Libya, violating  the UN resolution 1973. The assassination of Gaddafi, and subsequent collapse of Libyan state became a detonator of an ongoing #migrantcrisis in Europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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