Tag Archives: ISIS

ISIS claimed attack in Mozambique

The assailants destroyed houses, vandalised public spaces, and erected barricades along vital roads in Mozambique Cabo Delgado province. It is still unclear how many people were killed or wounded as most residents are still in hiding, and the government had yet to assess the situation.

The attackers were in control of the city until late on March 23-24 when Mozambican authorities said the fighters were dislodged.

But local press reports that the residents are still in shock and trying to come to terms with the attack.

The attack was claimed by an armed group, Ahlu Sunnah Wa-Jama, or ‘followers of the prophetic tradition’.

This was the most daring attack on Mocimboa da Praia, 90km (56 miles) from a major liquified natural gas project worth about $60bn.

The Islamist militant group has killed hundreds and displaced thousands since it launched attacks in October 2017, according to medical charity Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF).

More recently, the terrorist group ISIS has claimed responsibility via its media outlets, though there has been no independent confirmation of a link.

Mali: soldiers killed in attack

Dozens Malian soldiers have been killed in an attack on an army base in the country’s northeast in the town of Tarkint, north of Gao, according to the armed forces. French media indicated number of casualties has risen to 30 servicemen slain, and five wounded.

There was now immediate claim of responsibility for this attack, the deadliest against for the Malian army this year.

Mali’s army has repeatedly suffered heavy casualties from armed Islamists groups active in the area affiliated with al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (ISIS), intending to establish the Caliphate in West Africa.

Mali governor sacked over security failure

Mali’s council of ministers has sacked  Sidy Alassane Toure. the governor of Mopti region, after armed group killed dozens of people in the latest eruption of ethnic violence, it informed in a statement on Sobane Da village massacre. (Image: illustration Mopti view).

Unindentified attackers believed to belong to the Fulani ethnic group raided a  Dogon village near town Bankass, killing 35 people, according to the government, although a local authority maintains the real figure is 95 deaths. Neither has produced evidence for these tolls.

The government also declared three days of national mourning in the official annoucement.

Drawing lessons from this tragedy, the council of ministers dismissed the Mopti region’s governor,” the council announced via an issued statement.  Sidy Alassane Toure was the latest government official to lose his job as a result of authorities’ failure to contain spiraling ethnic violence around Mopti.

Malians have grown increasingly critical of failures of Keita‘s government to protect them from both ethnic violence and armed radical groups affiliated to al-Qaeda and the ISIS terrorists.

Morocco anti-terrorist raids continue

Morocco arrested a Swiss-Spanish double national on December 29 in connection with the killing of two Scandinavian tourists (pictured above), the counter-terrorism agency confirmed.

The authorities said he also held Spanish nationality with residence in Morocco.

The suspect was arrested for “involvement in recruiting Moroccan and sub-Saharan nationals to carry out terrorist plots in Morocco against foreign targets and security forces in order to take hold of their service weapons”, the Central Bureau for Judicial Investigations (BCIJ) said.

Nineteen other men have been arrested in connection with the case, including four main suspects who had pledged allegiance to Islamic State in a video made three days before the tourists’ before killings of Scandinavian women.

However police and domestic intelligence spokesman Boubker Sabik this week described the four men as “lone wolves”, and said “the crime was not coordinated with Islamic State”.

Mutilated corpses of Louisa Vesterager Jespersen, 24, from Denmark, and Maren Ueland, 28, from Norway were found by passing by tourists on December 17 near the village of Imlil in the Atlas Mountains.

 

Tripoli: Foreign ministry attacked

The suicide bombers attacked the building Foreign ministry in Tripoli (Libya) on December 25, leaving three dead and nine wounded according to Health ministry sources.

The assailants are suspected to be Islamic State (Caliphate) militants. Three attackers opened fire, entered the building and blow themselves up.

There are reports of fire going on, and photos of a cloud of a dense smoke above the roof of the building.  The emergency services and security are working at spot.

Suicide bombers have targeted a number of institutions as militant groups take advantage of the collapse of the Libyan state after the assassination of the countries leader Colonel Qaddafi of 20 October 2011. Since then Libya has been fragmented, victim to political rivalry, and is widely considered to be a failed state.

AMENDED:

“The terror attack today against the Libyan Ministry of Foreign Affairs further threatens the fragile security situation in Tripoli. We offer condolences to the families of the victims and wish a quick recovery for those injured” – said the External Action Service spokesperson statement published 5:30 pm – 25 Dec 2018.

“This and similar attacks against the sovereign institutions of Libya are unacceptable and those responsible must be held to account. The Libyan people have suffered too much violence already, they deserve to live in a peaceful, stable and secure country.

“We expect all legitimate Libyan stakeholders to rally towards this goal by putting the interest of the Libyan people first. We continue to support the efforts by the UN Special Representative to implement the re-calibrated UN Action Plan to move forward with the transition and to end the political crisis in Libya.”

Terrorist violence at rise in Africa

The number of violent incidents involving jihad groups in Africa has increased by +300% between 2010-2017, while the number of African countries experiencing sustained militant activity has more than doubled to 12 over the period, according to Africa Center.

The number of African countries experiencing sustained militant Islamist group activity has grown to 12: Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Egypt, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, and Tunisia). In 2010, there were just five (Algeria, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, and Somalia.

There has been a shift in the face of Islamist militancy in Africa over the 8-year time frame. In 2010, it was largely dominated by Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and al Shabaab. Now it is shared with Boko Haram and the Islamic State (ISIS). The number of active groups has also grown steadily. In 2010, there were five recognized militant Islamist groups operating on the continent: al Qaeda (in Egypt and Libya), al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), al Shabaab, Hizbul Islam, and Boko Haram. By end of 2017, the number was over 20.

EU renews its support to Egypt

“The Christian Coptic community has been targeted once again in Egypt: dozens of worshippers travelling on a bus in Al Minya in Egypt have been killed today (26.05.2017). We share the pain of the families of the victims, to whom we send our condolences, and of the many wounded,” – says the statement of the European External Actions Service spokesperson.

“When religious communities are attacked, all religious communities, the whole human kind is attacked. The freedom of faith and the right to pray in safety are fundamental human rights and whoever violates these rights commits a crime against humanity,” – continues the EEAS statement.

“As European Union, we renew our support and commitment along the Egyptian authorities and the Egyptian people in the fight against terrorism and we expect those responsible must be brought to justice and held accountable.”