Tag Archives: fine arts

IncarNations: Kendell Geers in Bozar

IncarNations is an exhibition created by the South African artist Kendell Geers in dialogue with the Congolese collector Sindika Dokolo. A fascinating initiative that reflects the diversity of the African artistic heritage, from an Afrocentric point of view and including the itineraries of slaves, colonialism and independence movements.

@KendellGeers

@KendellGeers

“Ethnographic museums are a negation of art because they prevent the objects on display from really looking at us. Because ethnography is constituted, at its colonial origins, as a science of what is radically other, it is in its nature to fabricate strangeness, otherness, separateness“, the Senegalese philosopher Souleymane Bachir Diagne writes.

Taken from Sindika Dokolo‘s impressive collection, the works of African artists enter into dialogue with those of the diaspora while contemporary works will be displayed alongside classical works.

Incarnations looks at African art as a living philosophical practice.

Works by Sammy Baloji, William Kentridge, Tracey Rose, Wangechi Mutu, Otobong Nkanga, Yinka Shonibare CBE, Pascale Marthine Tayou, Ana Mendieta, Kehinde Wiley, Andres Serrano, Aida Muluneh, Mwangi Hutter, Hank Willis Thomas, Tracey Rose, Adrian Piper, Lubaina Himid, Roger Ballen, Zanele Muholi, Phyllis Galembo and many others.

LOCATION:

BOZAR/Centre for Fine Arts @BOZARBrussels

Guided Tours on request

Info: +32 2 507 83 36 – groups@bozar.be

 

 

 

Cameroon masterpiece at BRAFA

Brussels Antiques & Fine Art Fair (BRAFA) traditionally presents a sophisticated collection of masterpieces of African art, and this year event reaffirms its excellence, sharing with art lovers rare, and mythic objects of authentic cultures.

Doustar Gallery, Brussels displays an extraordinary 19th century piece of Cameroon art: Atwonzen, a beaded head, worn in ancient mysterious rituals by chiefs of Bamileke people in Dschang region.  (Image below).

Art Without Frontiers” is the motto of BRAFA ambitious to celebrate art from every continent and every culture, which has been one of the strengths of the Fair, and one of the reasons explaining its international success. Masterpieces from Africa, America, the Middle East, Asia and Oceania broaden the horizons, and inspire, while bringing visitors in contact with the other forms of art and expression, to other representations and fascinating different visions of the world.

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The BRAFA Art Fair, created in 1956, is one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious art fairs, famous for the high quality fine art, antiques, modern and contemporary art and design. The Fair lasts for 9 days from the end of January to the beginning of February. The first major art event of the year, it is considered a reliable barometer of the art market.

atwonzen

Cape Town: Jürgen Dünhofen in Transitions art project

“Depicting leaps in our life from chaos to order, transitions started with observing the flow of chaos and order between zones of quietude and stressful, busy moments where big changes in our lives occurred.”

GROUND ART CAFFE 160 Strand street, Cape Town 8001 South Africa

A collaboration by Jürgen Dünhofen, Thurlo Adams & Adam Douglas

Moments of flux that accompany experiencing starkly different cultures, countless moves, acclimatizing to new environments and forming and nurturing new relationships – have been vital to the project Thurlo and Jürgen styles’ converse with each other as Adam‘s drone tracks mirror the fleeting emotions invoked in the drawings.

It’s been fascinating to watch the work develop, from a simple point of departure to a strong focus on portraiture emulating the theme. Adam Douglas is a musician, writer, photographer and educator living in Tokyo, Japan. He records under the names Kemek, Deeper Than Space and Dechirico, and previously collaborated with Jürgen Dünhofen on Drone Project 1.

Jürgen Dünhofen is an installation artist that works in various mediums. His work often focuses on mindfulness and perception. Transitions is the second project that he’s collaborated on. He is currently based in Cape Town, South Africa. Thurlo Adams is a visual artist and teacher who is currently based in Cape Town. He predominantly uses ink as his medium and focuses on detailed portraits. Transitions is his first collaborative project.

The exhibition runs from the 1st of November to the 5th of December 2018

Fragment: Jürgen Dünhofen

 

Fragment II

Ethiopia reopens debate on repatriation of artefacts

The UK  must permanently return all artifacts from Ethiopia held by the Victoria and Albert Museum and Addis Ababa will not accept them on loan, an Ethiopian government official said. The statement comes after the museum, one of London’s most emblematic tourist attractions, put Ethiopian treasures plundered by British forces in 1868 on display.

Well, it would be exciting if the items held at the V&A could be part of a long-term loan with a cultural institution in Ethiopia,” museum director Tristram Hunt said.

These items have never been on a long-term loan in Ethiopia, but as we look to the future I think what we’re interested in are partnerships around conservation, interpretation, heritage management, and these need to be supported by government assistance so that institutions like the V&A can support sister institutions in Ethiopia.”

Among the items on display are sacred manuscripts and gold taken from the Battle of Maqdala 150 years ago, when British troops ransacked the fortress of Emperor Tewodros II. The offer of a loan did not go far enough for Ethiopia.

 

“What we have asked (for) was the restitution of our heritage, our Maqdala heritage, looted from Maqdala 150 years ago. We presented our request in 2007 and we are waiting for it,” government minister Hirut Woldemariam said.

 “It is clearly known where these treasures came from and whom they belong to. Our main demand has never been to borrow them. Ethiopia’s demand has always been the restoration of those illegally looted treasures. Not to borrow them” – Ephrem Amare, Ethiopian National Museum director, added.

The V&A said the proposal of a long-term loan had come up as it discussed its Maqdala exhibition with Ethiopian authorities. “The   V&A  is committed to continuing this important and wide-ranging dialogue with colleagues at the Ethiopian Embassy in London,” it added in a statement.

In launching the Maqdala 1868 exhibition of what Hunt called “stunning pieces with a complex history” this month, he said the display had been organized in consultation with the Ethiopian community in London.

 “As custodians of these Ethiopian treasures, we have a responsibility to celebrate the beauty of their craftsmanship, shine a light on their cultural and religious significance and reflect on their living meaning, while being open about how they came to Britain,” he said in a blog on the museum website.

Contemporary African artists at rise

Contemporary African artists have been gaining appreciation on the international art market, a boom that’s been confirmed through record sales at auction.

However these artists remain part of an emerging market niche, as the Quartz news website pointed out: “For all the excitement around African contemporary art,” it wrote in March, “the continent still accounts for a fraction of the global art market.”

Art Basel‘s latest global art market analysis, “The Art Market 2018,” showed that combined sales of African and South American art constitute less than four percent of last year’s international market share. The US, China and the UK still strongly dominate the market, largely because these richer countries count more art collectors.

 

Jürgen Dünhofen ‘in solo’

Jürgen Dünhofen is a proud participant of  @KKNK2018,  the biggest Afrikaans cultural festival held in picturesque  streets of Oudtshoorn. The Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (KKNK) which “turns the sleepy town into a colourful and chaotic melting pot of performance, theatre, sound and visual art” Cape Town Magazine claims.

Among  Jürgen Dünhofen  latest creations – the monumental fresco (see Tweet below) assembling precision of the Oriental calligraphy, and fluidity of the Western gestural; the power of American expressionism, and refinement of Proto-Renaissance masters. The spectacular outcome is the unique in its integrity Abstract piece, striking with its polyphony, accumulating melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic qualities. which can without doubt claim the status of South African state of art.

“A multi disciplinary Artist, I’m especially fond of installation art. Besides carving out a career as an artist I love to teach as well as explore nature”- Jürgen Dünhofen writes about himself in a few humble lines. Graduate from the University of Cape Town, he advances the endeavour of contemporary art with courage and ease, making him one of the most brilliant South African creators of his generation.

The #KKNK2018 took place from the 29th March to the 4th April 2018.

Images: social networks, courtesy of Jürgen Dünhofen

“I enjoy being close to my work being able to write phrases onto the paper. I also like the ability to show movement easily when standing so close to the piece” -explained Dünhofen to Africa Diplomatic.