Tag Archives: FGM

Sudan bans FGM

“The decision of Sudan to ban female genital mutilation is another historic step forward in the country. We praise the Government of Sudan in its entirety for taking this bold and historic step towards the full realisation of women’s and girls’ rights. The road towards a democratic and prosperous Sudan with equal rights and opportunities for all is long, but can only be travelled by taking steps like these. The European Union stands ready to support Sudan to implement this decision.

“The same way they led the revolution last year, Sudanese women have led the fight to end female genital mutilation (FMG) in their country and serve as an example to the world.

“World leaders have committed to eliminate FGM by 2030; today this practice remains carried out in more than 90 countries in the world. Banning or criminalizing FGM is the first step of a long process to end a practice, which in many countries is enmeshed with tradition and religious beliefs.

“The European Union is committed to promote the global trend towards banning the FGM practice and all other forms of harmful practices discriminating against women in various ways”.

Statement by High Representative/ Vice-President Josep Borrell and Commissioner for International Partnerships Jutta Urpilainen on the ban of female genital mutilation original on Twitter inserted above.

FGM victims need psychological aid

African survivors of female genital mutilation (FGM) say they are in need of mental health aid, and urged governments and charities to provide support for dealing with long-term trauma.

Survivors and activists from across the continent attending a summit on FGM and child marriage in Senegal this week said mental health should have been on the agenda.

Common in 28 African countries, FGM is often seen as a rite of passage and justified for cultural or religious reasons but can cause chronic pain, infertility and even death.

FGM typically involves the partial or total removal of the external genitalia and is practiced on girls from infancy to adolescence, with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimating about 200 million women and girls have undergone the procedure.

World leaders pledged to end the practice under a set of global goals agreed in 2015.

Cut at 18 against her will, 29-year-old Lekumoisa said she has never received any services to help with the trauma.

 

Somali girl death after genital mutilation reminds of gruesom tradition

Human rights defenders expressed hope the death of a 10-year-old Somali girl bled to death after a failed female genital mutilation (FGM) may help raise awareness about the dangerous health risks associated with the ritual in a country almost 100% of women and girls are cut.

Deeqa Dahir Nuur died from blood loss earlier this week after being subjected to female genital mutilation in one of Somalia’s few reported FGM-related deaths.

Reportedly Nuur died at Dhusamareb hospital two days after her family had taken her to a cutter for female genital mutilation in Olol village. “The circumciser is suspected to have cut an important vein” Hawa Aden Mohamed, the director of a local women’s right group known as Galkayo Education Center for Peace and Development said. But by the time Nuur’s family realized they wouldn’t be able to stop the bleeding by themselves, it was too late.

Nuur’s death is one of only a few female genital mutilation-related deaths to have ever been reported in Somalia, a country with the world’s highest rate of FGM practice. But activists have said that just because FGM-related deaths aren’t reported doesn’t mean they aren’t happening.

Genital mutilation plagues EU’ African women

Half a million women in the EU and as many as 200 million worldwide are living with the consequences of female genital mutilation.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is one of the most brutal violations of women´s human rights. It consists of the partial or complete removal of the external female genitalia. Most often it is carried out  on girls aged between five and eight, usually in poor hygienic conditions. There are no medical benefits and it can provoke severe physical and psychological consequences for a lifetime. MEPs are reiterating their call to stop this barbaric practice worldwide on the occasion of the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation on 6 February.

 FGM is still performed in some African, Asian and Middle Eastern countries, but young girls from some immigrant families are not safe even in the EU, where FGM is considered a crime. In fact some 500,000 women across Europe have been subjected to FGM while a further 180,000 women and girls are at risk of being subjected to this practice every year.

“Culture, custom, religion, tradition or so-called honour cannot be a justification for any acts of violence against women,” said Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, chair of Parliament’s women’s rights committee.