Tag Archives: DR Congo

EU condemns Ituri massacres

Brussels 03.06.2021 “The European Union condemns in the strongest terms the massacres of civilians committed in recent days in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in particular in the Provinces of Ituri and North Kivu. The EU reiterates its concern over the continuing activities of armed groups accused of war crimes and serious violations of human rights and international humanitarian law in these provinces.

The perpetrators of these acts must be brought to justice by the authorities.

“The European Union renews its commitment to respect for international humanitarian law by all stakeholders. It invites the Congolese authorities and the security forces engaged to strengthen the protection of civilian populations.

“The European Union reaffirms its support for all those who are engaged as close as possible to the populations to face the consequences of the eruption of the Nyiragongo volcano and to come to the aid of the populations displaced either because of the persistence of insecurity or because of the natural disasters. The safety of humanitarian workers and their free access to disaster areas are essential conditions for ensuring the protection and support of affected populations.

“Efforts to tackle the causes of insecurity and instability in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo must be accelerated and translated into action”.

DRC: Nyiragongo volcano erupted

Brussels 23.05.2021 02:30 UPDATE: UPDATE: according to ICCN officials, the lava has slowed down drastically.

Brussels 23.05.2021 The Mount Nyiragongo volcano burst into activity Saturday, May 22, spewing red fumes into the night sky, said an AFP reporter in the nearby Democratic Republic of Congo city of Goma. Power was cut in the city and some residents began leaving their homes and heading towards the nearby border with Rwanda.

The last time Nyiragongo erupted was January 17, 2002, killing more than a hundred people and covering almost all of the eastern part of Goma with lava, including half of the airport’s landing strip.

Hundreds of thousands fled the city. The deadliest eruption of the 3,000-metre high volcano was in 1977, when more than 600 died. The Goma region, which lies in North Kivu province, bordering Rwanda and Uganda, has six volcanoes, all higher than 3,000 metres.

A lava flow from the Nyiragongo volcano, in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), reached the airport in the city of Goma, on the southern slope of the volcano, an official said on Saturday (May 22nd). local. “The situation has worsened,” noted in a message to his staff, an official of the Virunga National Park, where the volcano is located.

The sudden eruption caused panic among the population, who fled en masse to neighboring Rwanda, or heading west, to the Masisi region. On the night of Saturday to Monday, impressive images circulated on social networks, but not independently verified, showed homes on fire, slowly swallowed and then engulfed by glowing molten lava, in the northeastern outskirts of Goma. , especially in the Buhene district.

The deadliest eruption occurred in 1977 with over 600 deaths. According to a scenario that may turn out to be similar to the eruption on Saturday, lava slowly flowed towards the city, which it cut in two to flow into Lake Kivu.

Eid: Clashes in Kinshasa

Brussels 14.05.2021 A police officer in Democratic Republic of the Congo’s capital Kinshasa was beaten to death and 46 others were wounded as rival Muslim groups clashed during Eid celebrations on Thursday, a police spokesman said.

Members of two opposing camps vying for leadership positions in Congo’s Muslim community wrangled outside Kinshasa’s Martyrs Stadium Thursday morning, where they had planned to worship together as a demonstration of unity.

“Unfortunately, there were extremists who didn’t want the two groups to pray together today,” said Sylvano Kasongo, the chief the Kinshasa police.

Officers fired tear gas and warning shots to disperse the crowd. Rioters threw stones and destroyed a police vehicle.

DR COngo: government dismissal acceptance

The official resignation declaration from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) President Thisekedi acceptance of government dismissal has been signed, but there is no official reaction from former President and senator for life Joseph Kabila and Common Front for Congo (FCC). Political turmoil will persist in the coming months in the DRC.

Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) Prime Minister Sylvestre Ilunga Ilunkamba resigned on Friday,January 29, the presidency said, a move that will enable President Felix Tshisekedi to rid the government of his predecessor’s allies and push through his own policies.

Ilunga, an ally of former President Joseph Kabila, stepped down after parliament passed a no-confidence motion on Wednesday, January 27, the latest in a series of political victories for Tshisekedi over Kabila in recent weeks.

Ilunga “has just handed in his resignation,” the presidency said on Twitter. “He said he had taken note of the evolution of the current political situation.”

Ilunga this week initially called into question the no-confidence vote against him, before accepting its legitimacy on January 28.

DRC: clashes in Parliament

Brussels 08.12.2020 Congo’s parliament descended into chaos on December 8 as rival political groups threw chairs and buckets in a brawl that laid bare the tensions caused by the incumbent President Felix Tshisekedi’s to terminate his alliance with his predecessor, Joseph Kabila.

Tshisekedi announced on December 6 scheduled to cancel his governing coalition with allies of Kabila, while Kabila’s supporters claimed the move was illegal.

The standoff has raised fears of instability in the Republic whose economy has been hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, and whose recent history has been touched by repeated civil wars and political upheaval.

The parliament fight broke out in the main hall of the building between lawmakers and supporters from the two parties, one of whom appeared to be wielding a machete.

Tshisekedi’s supporters, some with sartorial look, hurled chairs, wooden batons and plastic buckets up a staircase toward Kabila partisans who bounced back.

One man was carried away bleeding injury on the head. The police had to disperse the belligerent groups with tear gas.

The two camps have a long history of bad blood. Tshisekedi and his late father were longtime opponents of Kabila, who governed from 2001 to January 2019.

Tshisekedi agreed to the coalition after his victory in the disputed 2018 election, in which he defeated Kabila’s chosen successor but Kabila allies won majorities in parliament, entitling them to most cabinet posts.

Frustrated by his inability to move on with his agenda, Tshisekedi said that he would try to form a new majority in parliament and, if unsuccessful, would call for new parliamentary elections.

Kabila, who stepped down last year under domestic and international pressure not to seek a third mandate, is eligible to run again in 2023.

EU-DRC: €20m for police reform

Brussels, 16.11.2020 The European Union (EU) is maintaining its commitment to the security of the people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) by earmarking €20 million from the 11th European Development Fund for the Police Reform Support Programme over five years. This brings EU support for police reform up to a total of €60 million.

“There can be no development and sustainable growth without a more peaceful environment. That is why the European Union is stepping up its support for security, peace and stability in the DRC. We are therefore backing the DRC’s government in its determination to continue the security, defence and justice reforms now under way, with full respect for human rights” European Commissioner for International Partnerships, Jutta Urpilainen, said.

The resumption of police reform is of paramount importance to increasing public confidence in the security forces and supporting the rule of law throughout the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

This new European aid programme is aimed at improving governance, protection for human rights and efforts to combat impunity and corruption. It has four specific objectives: improving the implementation of reforms and the accountability of the police; increasing the professionalism of the police and the criminal justice chain; improving human resource management; and, lastly, getting community policing up and running in order to restore public confidence.

Given the importance of recognising the equality of men and women and combating gender-based violence, including sexual violence, particular attention will be paid to gender issues.

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the European Union has been a long-standing partner, having provided a total of €670 million from the 11th European Development Fund for the period 2014-2020.

The priority sectors for European aid in the DRC are health, sustainable agriculture and the environment, infrastructure and governance, including defence, policing, justice and public finances.

The support programmes for the security sector, and more specifically the police, have contributed decisively to the implementation of police reform in the DRC, as highlighted by the creation of the Police Reform Monitoring Committee; the drafting of a framework act on the Congolese National Police (PNC) and strategic plans for the implementation of the reform; the creation of a database of police officers; the modernisation of the administration and the creation and construction of a police academy (ACAPOL).

This support has helped professionalise the police, paving the way for a civilian police force that is impartial and at the service of the community.

The EU support for security in the country follows on from the EUPOL DRC mission carried out from 2007 to 2014 as part of the common security and defence policy (CSDP), the first and second phases of the police reform support programmes financed by the EDF (€35 million) and the Congolese National Police reform support programme implemented from 2006 to 2020 with funding from the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (€5 million).

Belgium: Commandos versus Africa Museum

Brussels 29.09.2020 The lawyers of seven Belgium associations representing former para commandos and officers who have served in Africa have given notice to the Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA, or AfricaMuseum) in Tervuren. They ask that “any damage to the honour and reputation of the Belgian para commandos” be obliterated in a text next to a statue at the large rotunda of the museum, Antwerp newspaper reports

The associations demand that any link between the operation of the para commandos and the “crushing” of the rebels be removed. They want the museum to remove any reference “that damages the reputation of the Belgian para commandos”, by 12 October 2020 at the latest.

In the absence of action within the set term, the associations will start legal proceedings, the lawyers say in the notice of default.

It concerns the statue “La Belgique opportant la sécurité au Congo” (Belgium brings security to Congo) by Arsène Matton. In addition, Belgium is portrayed as protecting a sleeping man and child in the folds of its flag. A semi-transparent veil has been applied over that image, with a postcolonial image intended to evoke a “visual and semantic shock that should shed new light on a heavy heritage”.

The picture shows an armed soldier with the text “A Belgian para commando in Stanleyville in 1964, crushing the Simba rebels. The formal independence of Congo in 1960 has by no means sounded the death knell for foreign intervention ”. The seven associations consider that the first sentence of the text is “particularly misleading, hurtful and an attack on the honor” of the then Belgian para commandos. They already sent an open letter in July to the general director of the museum, Guido Gryseels, with Prime Minister Sophie Wilmès in copy.

According to the associations, this sentence establishes a “direct and unmistakable link” between the operation of the Belgian para commandos in Stanleyville, the former name of the current Kisangani, and the crushing of the Simba rebels. “This link is a clear historical untruth”, it sounds. “The intervention of the Belgian para commandos in Stanleyville from November 24 to 28, 1964 was after all a humanitarian operation that made it possible to free 2,375 hostages and was in no way intended to” crush the Simba rebels “. The humanitarian operation of the para commandos had no military purpose; and if Simba rebels were killed by para commandos during the humanitarian operation, it was only in situations of absolute necessity. ”
The associations demand that any link between the operation of the para commandos and the “crushing” of the rebels be removed. They want the museum to remove any reference “that damages the reputation of the Belgian para commandos”, by 12 October 2020 at the latest.

In the absence of action within the set term, the associations will start legal proceedings, the lawyers say in the notice of default.

EU ministers discuss Congo in first ranks

The Foreign Affairs Council will start with a discussion on current affairs. The High Representative and foreign ministers may refer to the situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo. (Image: EU top diplomat Federica Mogherini doorstep before the Foreign Affairs Council).

 

 

President Tshisekedi calls for “Congo for all”

Felix Tshisekedi called for national reconciliation while succeeding Joseph Kabila as Democratic Republic of Congo’s president, in a first democratic transfer of power in 59 years of independence.

We want to build a strong Congo, turned toward its development in peace and security,” he said to thousands of supporters gathering on the lawn of the presidential palace. “A Congo for all, in which everyone has a place.”

The inaugural ceremony was briefly interrupted when Tshisekedi had a spell of dizziness during his inaugural address and had to sit down. However he returned to the podium moments after a brief pause, saying he was exhausted by the election and the emotion of the moment. Some media reported there was a problem of bulletproof vest, being fixed too tight.