Tag Archives: Donald Trump

World giraffe day

Their habitat is being lost at an alarming rate, not to mention the myriad other threats they deal with, including poaching,  the trade in giraffe parts, giraffe skin disease, vehicle collisions, and droughts.

There are a lot of factors leading to the giraffe’s 40% decline in the last 30 years that are difficult to tackle as the human population grow around many giraffe populations is soaring; that giraffes are having to travel farther to find critical resources, like food and water, due to habitat loss.

Giraffes are brilliant animals. They are known to be very smart at adapting to their environment. Giraffes have learned to gulp, while drinking water, in order to avoid predators while in a vulnerable position. When it comes to sleep, it is not easy of being able to move in a matter of seconds in the body of a 1300 kg,  but they have adapted to be able to survive on 30 minutes or less of sleep a day.

Recently the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has been asked to consider listing giraffes under the Endangered Species Act through a lawsuit after it failed to respond to 2017 listing petition. This would help the species by limiting the U.S. trade in giraffe parts and sport-hunted trophies, among other benefits.

 

Trump and Haftar discussed need for peace

White House informed that President Donald Trump had a telephone conversation with  Libyan Commander Khalifa Haftar and discussed “ongoing counter terrorism efforts and the need to achieve peace and stability in Libya.”

The telephone call took place on April 15, Monday, however it was announced by the administration only by the end of the week.

Commander Haftar has double US and Libyan citizenship.

President Trumprecognized Field Marshal Haftar‘s significant role in fighting terrorism and securing Libya’s oil resources, and the two discussed a shared vision for Libya’s transition to a stable, democratic political system,” the White House said in its official readout of the call.

 

 

Trump deploys troops in Gabon ready to act

The US military has deployed additional soldiers to Gabon amid fears of violent protests in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in the aftermath of the presidential elections.

President Trump wrote a letter to the Congress informing about 80 troops had arrived in Gabon on the beginning of January to protect US citizens and diplomatic missions in case of the violence out in Congo’s capital Kinshasa. The DRC‘s electoral commission is scheduled to release the provisional results of the presidential election on Sunday, but later added that there could be delays because of the slow arrival of tally sheets. “The first of these personnel arrived in Gabon on January 2, 2019, with appropriate combat equipment and supported by military aircraft,” Trump’s letter to Congress read.

Additional forces may deploy to Gabon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or the Republic of the Congo, if necessary for these purposes.

These deployed personnel will remain in the region until the security situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo becomes such that their presence is no longer needed.”

trump letter 4 jan

Military sent to protect Americans in Congo

US troops will assist US citizens, and personnel in Democratic Republic of Congo in case violent protests over recent elections threaten their security. The measure is taken by precaution.

trump letter 4 jan

These deployed personnel will remain in the region until the security situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo becomes such that their presence is no longer needed” President Trump wrote in a letter to the Congress.

Trump declines talks with Ramaphosa amid farm murders

At margins of the United Nations General Assembly President Donald Trump declined bilateral talks with South African counterpart Cyril Ramaphosa.

Reportedly US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will have a meeting with International Relations and Cooperation Lindiwe Sisulu to clarify the  situation in South Africa upon request of the US President, who expressed concerns with ongoing brutal murders of farmers.

In a tweet a month ago President Trump asked Secretary Pompeo to clarify the situation at “land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large-scale killing of farmers”. Sisulu admitted at the time to being “taken aback” by Trump‘s tweet, which followed a report on Fox News claiming that the South African government had started with “racist” farm seizures against white farmers.

The concerns are aggravated by repeated calls for violence articulated by Marxist politician Julius Maleman, who calls his followers to expropriate land from white farmers. At public gatherings Malema repeatedly sings  “kill the farmer” song, which is the “hate speech” in form and in essence.

The issue has become chronic problem, but in denial of obvious ANC ruling party did not adopt a strategy to stop farm murders, proposed by Congress of the People leader Mosiuoa Lekota.

EU expects Arab League aid in handling migration

On 19 September the heads of state or government met for an informal working dinner on migration in Salzburg, Austria. Leaders discussed the latest developments in this area. They took note that the number of irregular arrivals has been reduced and is now even lower than in the years before the crisis.

The heads of state or government also agreed to strengthen cooperation with third countries, including Egypt.

Together with chancellor Kurz we have started a dialogue with the Egyptian President and now we can say that there is a backing from the European Council for this and similar dialogues” said president of the EU Council Donald Tusk, who will meet President Al Sisi in September to take the cooperation forward. In this context, the leaders also agreed to organise a summit with the League of Arab States in February 2019.

 

Trump concerned with killings of farmers in South Africa

President Trump tweeted that he had directed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to investigate “the South Africa land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers”: South African farm killings — where victims are typically members of the country’s white, Afrikaans-speaking minority — are often extremely brutal in nature, involving prolonged periods of torture.

Farming in South Africa became one of the most dangerous occupations in the world, because of abhorrent in its cruelty murders of predominantly white farmers and their families. The government continuously rejects the political motives behind the murders, while farmers themselves blame Marxist groups for extremism, pushing farmers away in land grab attempts, promoted by certain political forces, including  those led by Julius Malema.

This year  dominated by the Marxist African National Congress (ANC), voted on to confiscate without compensation all of the land owned by white farmers in South Africa.

Farmers killing SA chart

A number of private organisations and agricultural trade unions collect and publish their own statistics on farm murders and attacks. When citing and interpreting these statistics it is crucial to check the definition being used to identify incidences. They may differ from the official statistics released by the police, indicating farm murder rate of 156 per 100,000.

The AfriForum Research Institute collected and assessed statistics for 2016/2018 recording 357 attacks and 74 murders between 1 April 2016 and 31 March 2017. The official police farm attacks statistics differ but their tally of farm murders was the same.

The institute’s report notes that their statistics were collected by monitoring traditional and social media. They also rely on security networks and victims to directly report attacks.

Author of the report and researcher at the institute, Lorraine Claasen, told Africa Check that they record incidences that occur on residential smallholdings and rural plots, which differs from the police’s definition.

(There are no scenes of violence or disturbing graphics on the video below, however the interviewed refers to facts of atrocities committed by farm murderers).

 

Al-Shabaab claimed killing of U.S. military

One U.S. special operations soldier was killed and four U.S. service members wounded in an “enemy attack” on Friday, June 8, in Somalia, the U.S. military said — casualties that are likely to put renewed scrutiny on America’s counterterror operations in Africa.

It’s the first public announcement of a U.S. military combat death on the continent since four U.S. service members were killed in a militant ambush in Niger in October.

Al-Shabab claimed credit for the attack, the SITE Intelligence Group said in a statement Friday.

The U.S. has about 1,000 special operations personnel in Africa. The last killing of a U.S. service member in Somalia was in May 2017 during an counterterrorist operation west of Mogadishu.

President Donald Trump paid tribute on Twitter Friday night, offering “thoughts and prayers” to the families of the soldier who was killed and those who were wounded. “They are truly all HEROES,” he tweeted.

 

 

Trump retreats on imports of hunting trophies

President Donald Trump said in a tweet on Friday he is putting a decision to allow imports of elephant trophies on hold after a torrent of criticism from conservation advocates and across social media.

Trump’s reversal came hours after his administration released a rule on Friday to allow hunters who kill elephants in Zimbabwe to bring their trophies back to the United States, which had been banned by the Obama administration.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said in a statement that he had spoken with Trump and “both believe that conservation and healthy herds are critical.” He said the “issuing of permits is being put on hold as the decision is being reviewed.”

Early word of the planned change had drawn protests from conservationists, who said it could deplete already at-risk elephant populations. It also caused a social media firestorm, with opponents posting photos of President Donald Trump’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric, avid hunters, posing with dead wild animals.