Tag Archives: Cape Town

Meghan starring as «part-time féminist»

Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, danced with a group of mentors who teach vulnerable youngsters from townships to swim and surf. However the international attention was attracted to their visit to South Africa’s oldest mosque – Auwal Mosque in Bo-Kaap in Cape Town – on September 24, the second day of their Africa tour. Meghan Markle stepped out of the car wearing headscarf and floor-length dress, disguised in Prophet worshiper. The couple were met by Imam Sheikh Ismail Londt and Muslim community leader Mohamed Groenwald.

The royals visited the Waves for Change project, which grew from a small surfing club started in Masiphumelele township in 2009, and which is intended to help young people from violent communities to develop trust and confidence through sports and recreation at Monwabisi beach .

UK media has interpreted Meghan Markle debut in scarf as a sign of respect to Muslim worshipers, reminding of Princess Diana appearance in headscarf at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Hospital in Lahore, Pakistan, in 1996. However they have completely omitted the evolution of the public perception of Islam of after 11/9.

The Muslim outfit of Meghan Markle in floor length dress and headscarf has also caused indignation of feminists, and all those who strive for gender equality in Muslim societies. Social media dubbed the Duchess as a “part-time feminist“, or “Royal feminist”.

https://twitter.com/bobbelvedere/status/1176548109205364737?s=21

Cape Town: Jürgen Dünhofen in Transitions art project

“Depicting leaps in our life from chaos to order, transitions started with observing the flow of chaos and order between zones of quietude and stressful, busy moments where big changes in our lives occurred.”

GROUND ART CAFFE 160 Strand street, Cape Town 8001 South Africa

A collaboration by Jürgen Dünhofen, Thurlo Adams & Adam Douglas

Moments of flux that accompany experiencing starkly different cultures, countless moves, acclimatizing to new environments and forming and nurturing new relationships – have been vital to the project Thurlo and Jürgen styles’ converse with each other as Adam‘s drone tracks mirror the fleeting emotions invoked in the drawings.

It’s been fascinating to watch the work develop, from a simple point of departure to a strong focus on portraiture emulating the theme. Adam Douglas is a musician, writer, photographer and educator living in Tokyo, Japan. He records under the names Kemek, Deeper Than Space and Dechirico, and previously collaborated with Jürgen Dünhofen on Drone Project 1.

Jürgen Dünhofen is an installation artist that works in various mediums. His work often focuses on mindfulness and perception. Transitions is the second project that he’s collaborated on. He is currently based in Cape Town, South Africa. Thurlo Adams is a visual artist and teacher who is currently based in Cape Town. He predominantly uses ink as his medium and focuses on detailed portraits. Transitions is his first collaborative project.

The exhibition runs from the 1st of November to the 5th of December 2018

Fragment: Jürgen Dünhofen

 

Fragment II

May vows to invest in Africa

Theresa May has announced plans to boost the UK investment in Africa after leaving the European Union. The declaration of intention took place during her first trip to the continent as prime minister.

In a speech in Cape Town, May pledged four billion pounds in support for African economies, especially aiming on fighting unemployment among young people.

May also pledged a “fundamental shift” in aid spending to focus on long-term economic and security challenges rather than short-term poverty reduction.

The prime minister will also visit Nigeria and Kenya during the three-day travel though the continent.

On her way to South Africa, the prime minister dismissed warnings from the chancellor about possible economic damage of no-deal scenario could would cause.

Talking to journalists on board RAF Voyager on Tuesday, 28 August, May reiterated that she believed a no-deal Brexit was still better than a bad deal – adding no-deal “wouldn’t be the end of the world“.

Prime minister’s Common Wealth trip foreseeing meetings the presidents of all three countries – aims to deepen economic and trade ties with growing African economies ahead of Britain leaving the EU end of March 2019.

Iceberg to quench Cape Town thurst

“Icebergs are made of the purest freshwater on earth,” Nick Sloane, the founder of Sloane Marine Ltd says, reflecting upon possible ways to save Cape Town from drought. “Thousands break off every year. Mother Nature has been teasing mankind with this for a long time, saying ‘this is here’.”

Nick Sloane estimates it would cost $100 million (S$137.3 million) to tow an iceberg to Cape Town that could take up to three months, and another US$50-60 million to harvest the water for one year as it melts.

In Russia, they have pushed icebergs away from oil installations, Sloane continues to explain his plan, pointing at existing experience. However Russian engineers managed  to push away only small icebergs of half-a-million tons. But Cape Town challenge requires a 100 million tons of ice to quench residents thrust.

Dr Chris von Holdt from Aurecon advisory practice, who has done a technical assessment and economic evaluation of the iceberg proposal, said: “I believe it has sufficient technical feasibility and economic merit to be considered seriously as a supply option for filling the supply gaps during periods of drought.”

Dr Olav Orheim, a former director or the Norwegian Polar Institute has analysed 271 000 icebergs, of which only 7% would be suitable, because the shape must be tabular, with a flat top and steep sides, and a thickness of 200m to 250m.

Once a suitable iceberg has been assessed, it will be “hacked”.

Two tugs will encircle the iceberg, pulling an enormous piece of geotextile material around it as a “skirt” that reaches down the sides of the iceberg beneath the sea.

A third tug stands by as back up. A tanker will then tow the iceberg, with the distance between the tanker and the iceberg about 1.5 km.

The two tugs will steam alongside, ensuring the iceberg stays on its course to Cape Columbine north of Saldanha Bay.

For reasons of the severe drought, the iceberg cannot go close inshore but will “anchor” itself on the seabed about 40 km offshore.

It will then be moored using a system similar to that used by certain offshore oil rigs.

In a way it will resemble one of the giant installations of artists Christo and Jean-Claude wrapped in fabric.

 

 

Cape Town restaurant leads in Africa

Cape Town restaurant The Test Kitchen under direction of Luke Dale-Roberts entered the list of 50 best in the world, and got labeled number One on the African continent in 2018. Time to celebrate!

What makes it unique: The first fine dining restaurant to open in Cape Town gentrifying Woodstock, The Test Kitchen launched an artistic boom with food based on rich palette of South African ingredients, and a pronounced Oriental touch. Chef Luke Dale-Roberts restaurant has two dining areas – “dark” and “light”. One starts dinner with cocktails served in a “dark” room, and then serving dishes is taking place in ‘light’ at tables with white cloths.

About the chef: Luke Dale-Roberts was born in rural England and had an active youth, fishing and stolling in nature. He was aiming to become an electrician, but then discovered his interest in food and excelled at cooking school as a teen. After the start in the UK, he enjoyed working in different Asian countries, in Bali, South Korea and Japan, trotting the world, fascinated by the universe of technique, flavours and ingredients of Oriental cooking. Further Dale-Roberts introduces this exquisite Oriental food know-how to his own restaurant, achieving amazing results in shaping local rich foods with exquisite Oriental refinement into contemporary compositions. Luke Dale-Roberts attaches greatest importance to learning experiences and sophistication of skills.

Typical dishes: The experience starts with distinctive small bites from around the world like ceviche and roti paired with cocktails in the quiet dark room. More classic-mod fare is served in the buzzy light room – like eiland (local oryx) carpaccio, local kingklip smoked with curry leaves and scallops with a Cape Malay sabayon.

The Old Biscuit Mill, 375 Albert Road, Woodstock, Cape Town
+27 21 447 2337

African art auction in Cape Town

In a warehouse in Cape Town docks on Saturday 17 February the art world will enjoy a thrilling event of a contemporary African art auction, organised by

Art collectors, curators, critics and artists will stream to the Cruise Terminal at the V and A Waterfront to try their chance to acquire an African masterpiece. There will be well established names: as Ayanda Mabulu, whose pieces were bought by President Jacob Zuma, and many other artists, who has not reached zenith yet such as Patrick Bongoy from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Blessing Ngobeni and Mongezi Ncaphayi. Hopefully some of the artefacts will be purchased by Museums to remain in direct contact with general public. However, as art experts say, any remarkable private collection trend to become public if reaching a certain level of quality and amount of artefacts.

 

SA drought threatens tourism

A chronic drought that could leave South Africa’s Cape Town without water within weeks is hurting visitor numbers and damaging economy officials said.

With experts predicting Cape Town will run out of water in mid-April, residents have been told to limit usage to 50 liters per person per day. (A bath holds 80 liters of water).

Hotels have asked guests not to use baths and to limit showers to two minutes or less, while some restaurants are switching to disposable cups and ditching table linen.

Around 10 million tourists visited Cape Town last year, drawn by iconic sights like Table Mountain, its long sandy beaches and clutch of nearby wine farms.

Tourism accounted for an estimated 9 percent of South Africa’s economic output last year, or 412 billion rand ($35 billion).

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