Tag Archives: Alessane Ouattara

Ouattara III term confirmed by Judges

Brussels 09.11.2020 A week after the announcement of the victory of Alassane Ouattara, the Constitutional Council confirms the results published by the Electoral Commission, which gave 94.27% of the vote to the outgoing President.

https://twitter.com/jeune_afrique/status/1325803663496007680?s=20

The Ivorian Constitutional Council declared the ballot “regular” and validated, this Monday, November 9, the final results of the Ivorian presidential election of October 31, confirming those proclaimed a week earlier by the Independent Electoral Commission (CEI).

Alassane Ouattara, 78, was officially elected for a third term with 94.27% of the votes cast, following a campaign marked by an “active boycott” of the opposition. The participation rate is 53.90%.

Côte d’Ivoire: EU notes disparities

“The European Union (EU) takes note of the announcement of the provisional results announced by the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). The lack of consensus on the electoral framework has fractured the country. Many Ivorians went to the polls, but many others did not, either by choice or by impediment due to violence and blockades” the head of the European Union diplomacy wrote on his Twitter micro blog.

“The EU notes the very wide disparities in the participation rate in the different regions of the country, as highlighted by several election observation missions present there.
“The EU expresses its deep concern at the tensions, provocations and incitement to hatred that prevailed and continue to persist in the country around this election. The violence which has caused the death of several people and injured many must be independently investigated so that justice can be served as soon as possible.

“The EU expects all stakeholders to take the initiative in favour of calming the climate and resuming dialogue, involving new generations and promoting reconciliation through very concrete measures that will turn the page on violence and division. It will support any effort deployed in this direction by national and international actors”.

Côte d’Ivoire: EU concerned with violence

“On the eve of the presidential election in Côte d’Ivoire, the European Union associates itself with the statement by the Secretary General of the United Nations” reads the statement of the EU top diplomat Josep Borrell, addressing the upcoming presidential election in Côte d’Ivoire.

“It expresses its greatest concern following the violent incidents and hate speech observed in recent weeks. “She urges all political actors to show responsibility, restraint and reject any violence.
It calls on the institutions in charge of the electoral process to ensure a transparent, credible and peaceful ballot”.

Ivorian voters have planned vote this Saturday, October 31, to designate their President. The campaign for this ballot has already resulted in around thirty deaths – mainly due to hate crimes between the north and south – and there are fears of new violence on the election day and during the announcement of the results.

The opposition parties have insisted that the incumbent President Ouattara has served the maximum two terms allowed by the Constitution. Mr Ouattara’s supporters insist that the two-term limit was reset when a new constitution was adopted in 2016.

Henri Konan Bédié, 86, from Democratic Party of Ivory Coast (PCDI). Served as president between 1993 and 1999, deposed in coup, and Pascal Affi N’Guessan, 67, from Ivorian Popular Front (FPI) faction, who served as prime minister between 2000 and 2003 under then-President Laurent Gbagbo are the major competitors of the incumbent President Ouattara.

EU supports cocoa producers

Brussels, 23.09.2020 “The construction of the new industrial complex will allow the local processing of one million tons of cocoa against 650,000 tons today, the creation of jobs, the increase in State revenues and the strengthening of the economic growth of our country” Cote d’Ivoire President Alassane Ouattara said, at inauguration of the event. Cote d’Ivoire and Ghana account for almost two thirds of world cocoa output.

The cocoa producers also attracted attention of the EU, the biggest importer of the African cocoa beans, on average consuming almost a half of the produced amount. This week the European Commission has launched an initiative to improve sustainability in the cocoa sector. A new multi-stakeholder dialogue brings together representatives of Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana – the two main cocoa producing countries accounting for 70% of global cocoa production – as well as representatives of the European Parliament, EU Member States, cocoa growers and civil society. The dialogue aims to deliver concrete recommendations to advance sustainability across the cocoa supply chain through collective action and partnerships. The new dialogue will be supported by technical assistance for cocoa producing countries.

“The cocoa sector is important for the EU and our trading partners. Today’s launch of the multi-stakeholder dialogue for sustainable cocoa will help to guide the sector’s recovery from Covid-19, while also finding solutions to existing sustainability challenges. We plan to develop concrete recommendations on sustainable cocoa as trade is not only about growth and profits, but also the social and environmental impact of our policies,” executive Vice-President and acting Trade Commissioner Valdis Dombrovskis said.

“When we talk about cocoa, sustainability is key” said Jutta Urpilainen, Commissioner for International Partnerships. “Lifting up the three pillars of sustainable development in one go – social, economic and environmental – is possible. We stand ready to act as an honest broker to create the foundation of a new international framework for sustainable cocoa.”

A series of thematic groups set under the multi-stakeholder dialogue will meet between October 2020 and July 2021 to: discuss ways to encourage responsible practices of EU businesses involved in cocoa supply chains;
feed into other relevant ongoing Commission initiatives, including on due diligence and deforestation;
feed into the policy discussions between the EU and the involved cocoa producing countries: Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana; guide the European Commission in the design and deployment of support projects on sustainable cocoa production.
A plenary session in autumn 2021 will take stock of progress and a public report will review progress on the recommendations and lay out further steps to be taken.

The dialogue corresponds to the EU’s political priorities under the Green Deal and the Commission’s ‘zero tolerance’ approach to child labour. It also builds on Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana’s joint initiative of June 2019 on a minimum price for cocoa on the world market and the Living Income Differential that they put in place with representatives of the cocoa and chocolate industry to ensure decent revenue for local farmers.

The new initiative for sustainable cocoa is part of a broader set of the European Commission’s measures to address sustainability issues horizontally and within the sector. They include a policy dialogue with Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana to make sure that increase of prices is linked to actions halting deforestation and eliminating child labour in cocoa supply chains.

Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana are the world’s largest exporters of raw cocoa, generating some 60% of global exports (ITC 2020). Cocoa is a major contributor to export earnings, as well as the main source of livelihoods for up to six million farmers in Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. Indirectly, cocoa contributes to the livelihoods of further 50 million people (UNCTAD 2016). At the same time, cocoa production entails particular risks relating to child labour, low revenues for local farmers, deforestation and forest degradation.

The European Union is the world’s largest importer of cocoa, accounting for 60% of world imports (ITC 2020). Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana are major suppliers of cocoa into the EU market, to which they have duty-free and quota-free access under their respective Economic Partnership Agreements.

Ivorian President Alassane Ouattara and his Ghanaian counterpart Nana Akufo-Addo signed the Abidjan Declaration back in 2018, thereby creating “an OPEC for cocoa”. Through this partnership, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana – which together produce 65% of the world’s cocoa – will harmonise their sales policies to have greater impact and increase their earnings.

Back in July 2019, Côte d’Ivoire’s Coffee and Cocoa Board (CCC) and the Ghana Cocoa Board (COCOBOD) successfully imposed a pricing mechanism to help producers earn a living wage. Their suspension of forward sales of cocoa beans had such a negative impact on global prices that, in less than a month, chocolate traders and makers agreed to the idea of a $400 a tonne premium on all cocoa sales contracts.

Cote d’Ivoire President Ouattara aims at re-election

Cote d’Ivoire President Alassane Ouattara,78, will seek re-election in October this year after his proposed successor, former Prime Minister Amadou Gon Coulibaly, died last month.

The announcement made by Ouattare on Twitter microblog says: «I am the candidate for the presidential elections on 31 October 2020».

«This decision, carefully considered, is a duty that I accept in the best interests of the Nation; in order to continue to put my experience tirelessly at the service of our country» he added.

Alassan Ouattara won a second five-year term in 2015 with almost 84% of the vote. With 2,118,229 votes, or 83.66% of votes cast, and a 54.63% turnout.

President Tajani s’adresse à la Côte d’Ivoire

«Grace à la diversification et à une base industrielle, la Côte-d’Ivoire se classe parmi les économies les plus dynamiques du monde. Avec une croissance estimée à 8% cette année, elle se place en tête du continent africain. La Côte-d’Ivoire doit servir d’exemple à d’autres pays du continent, en particulier en Afrique de l’Ouest» a déclaré le Président du Parlement européen à l’issue de sa rencontre avec le Président de la Côte-d’Ivoire, Alassane Ouattara.

«Nous devons approfondir notre partenariat et notre coopération avec la Côte d’Ivoire dans de nombreux domaines» a souligné Tajani, expliquant que : «la venue en plénière du Président Ouattara, un mois après celle du Président de la Commission de l’Union Africaine, Moussa Faki Mahamat, confirme que l’Afrique est une priorité pour l’Union européenne.»

Le Président Tajani a poursuivi: «la Côte d’Ivoire a un enjeu démographique mais un potentiel économique extraordinaire. Il faut donc investir dans la jeunesse en donnant des perspectives futures. Pour cela, une vraie diplomatie économique est nécessaire qui encourage les PME, l’entreprenariat, aussi féminin, et regarde aux secteurs porteurs de croissance comme le numérique.»

«Je salue aussi le fort engagement du Président Ouattara dans la lutte contre la menace terroriste. Il ne faut pas oublier que la Côte d’Ivoire aussi a été frappée par des attaques. La coopération entre l’Union européenne, la CÉDÉAO et l’Union Africaine est cruciale dans ce domaine, en particulier dans le Sahel et en Lybie pour éviter que les groupes terroristes se propagent dans d’autres régions du continent africain», a conclu Tajani.